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MailTribune.com
  • The Power of Rowing

  • It's 7:30 on this early summer morning, chilly, overcast and windy. Four women power their boat through the choppy waters of Emigrant Lake, training for the Klamath Rural Henley. "All four! Sit ready to row! ROW!" calls the coxswain. Four women move in unison, squaring their oars, placing them carefully into the water and pulling together with the full strength of backs, legs, arms, hearts and minds.
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    • Row for the Cure
      For the last several years, the Ashland Rowing Club (ARC) has participated in Portland's Row for the Cure Regatta, one of many held all over the world to benefit the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Fo...
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      Row for the Cure
      For the last several years, the Ashland Rowing Club (ARC) has participated in Portland's Row for the Cure Regatta, one of many held all over the world to benefit the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. Today, Row for the Cure is a multi-sport regatta that includes canoe/kayak, dragon boat, and American Indian canoes participating in regattas on both U.S. coasts. While none of the ARC boats won their 2006 race, the club took home the fundraising trophy with more than $12,000 raised to support breast cancer awareness and treatment.

      "People were so generous, because everybody knows somebody who's had breast cancer," says Michelle Pauly, who rowed with the club. She reports that nearly all of those funds come back to the Rogue Valley to help low-income women with the cost of mammograms and other breast-cancer related expenses.

      For more information on Row for the Cure 2007 and the Ashland Rowing Club, visit www.ashlandrowingclub.org or phone (541) 488-9308.
  • It's 7:30 on this early summer morning, chilly, overcast and windy. Four women power their boat through the choppy waters of Emigrant Lake, training for the Klamath Rural Henley. "All four! Sit ready to row! ROW!" calls the coxswain. Four women move in unison, squaring their oars, placing them carefully into the water and pulling together with the full strength of backs, legs, arms, hearts and minds.
    One of the rowers is 53-year-old Michelle Pauly, Jackson County deputy district attorney, who by day frequents the courtroom dressed in heels and hose. Outside of these hours, more often than not you'll find her on the lake in Lycra shorts and a ball cap to restrain her flyaway hair. The same focused energy and competitive edge that win convictions in the courtroom now serve her well on the lake.
    Michelle lost her dad in January 2006 and found herself in a deep depression. "The death of a loved one is such an incredibly stressful event and I'd never gone through that," she remembers. "I couldn't sleep; I wasn't eating very healthily; I was losing weight."
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