Not thrilled to be back at work? You're not alone. Forty-eight percent of workers said they're not motivated to go back to work after Labor Day, according to a survey in August of 770 U.S. part- and full-time workers.

Not thrilled to be back at work? You're not alone. Forty-eight percent of workers said they're not motivated to go back to work after Labor Day, according to a survey in August of 770 U.S. part- and full-time workers.

"Almost half of our work force doesn't look forward to returning to work on Tuesday morning," said Rich Wellins, senior vice president at Development Dimensions International, the human-resource consulting company in Pittsburgh that conducted the study.

The chore of "working on the same projects as last year" was the top reason for their lack of motivation, with 37 percent of the unmotivated respondents pointing to that as a problem.

"They're telling us that work is becoming monotonous, they're doing the same old stuff, they'd like some change, some variety," Wellins said.

Meanwhile, the 52 percent of workers who say they're motivated to go back to work pointed mainly to the fact that they are "excited to start new projects," with 35 percent pointing to that reason.

Some of the unmotivated workers in the survey may be experiencing job burnout.

Thirty percent of those surveyed said even after they take a vacation, they never had that "just had a vacation," relaxed frame of mind, and another 19 percent say that feeling disappears before they return to the office. Meanwhile, 23 percent of those surveyed said they didn't take any vacation time this summer.

"My fear is we're not taking enough time to smell the roses," Wellins said. "No one's ever on their deathbed saying, 'I wish I'd put a few more days into work,'" he said.

A feeling that you lack control can also lead to burnout, said Beverly Potter, a psychologist who specializes in career and workplace issues and author of "Overcoming Job Burnout."

The solution? "Create a sense of empowerment," she said, by managing yourself. That includes "setting goals, pacing ourselves and rewarding ourselves," she said. "All of that gives us a sense of control."

Set goals — but take small steps to attain them, rewarding yourself along the way, Potter said. "If I just do a little bit of this work, I can go get that reward off the want list. It serves as a reinforcement for whatever 'this' is."

For some, the first response to burnout is to look for a new job, but that's not always the best answer. "All too often people think of (a new job) as the first option," Potter said.

"They don't even know what the problem is so they quit and get another job and that may be even worse because they don't even know what the problem was at the first job ... you have to know what was wrong with this job, what made me so miserable here, so demoralized."

First try to improve the situation at your current job, she said. If that doesn't work, then consider leaving.