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  • October Garden Calendar

  • gardening basics
    • email print
    • garden club meetings
      § ASHLAND (482-2950)

      Monday, Nov. 5

      Companion planting

      Kathy Grisson

      § CENTRAL POINT (664-1726)

      Wednesday, Nov. 7

      Christmas ideas: ...
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      garden club meetings
      § ASHLAND (482-2950)

      Monday, Nov. 5

      Companion planting

      Kathy Grisson

      § CENTRAL POINT (664-1726)

      Wednesday, Nov. 7

      Christmas ideas: getting ready for winter

      § JACKSONVILLE (899-6994)

      Thursday, Nov. 15

      Perennials: What everyone wants to know!

      § MEDFORD (774-3930)

      Friday, Nov. 16

      Wildlife Images

      Jamie Guest

      § TALENT (535-9088)

      Saturday, Nov. 3

      Preparing your garden for the winter

      Ann Rich, Ashland Parks and Recreation
  •  Plant ornamental bulbs now through December. This is also a good time to dig up bulbs that have gone "blind" (they have no bloom). Discard these or divide and plant elsewhere with bulb fertilizer. They may take an extra year to return to blooming. That's because the embryonic flower is "set" into the bulb in the spring, using food gathered by the leaves. Remember that, next time you are tempted to cut off daffodils' limp leaves before they yellow and die back.
     Drain and store hoses; put fertilizers and chemicals in a dry place.
     Tie up canes on berry plants. Prune fall-bearing raspberries.
     Spray dormant oil on fruit trees to prevent fungus and smother insect eggs. Between now and February, spray lime sulphur on grape vines to prevent fungus disease.
     Keep your holiday lights "on" in a covered bed or cloche to keep greens producing into the winter.
     Check out the article on flower arranging in this issue for ways to use ornamental plant cuttings.
     Cut roses down to waist height to protect root structures from winter winds.
     Cold, wet soil encourages fungal growth. Perennials without adequate drainage will experience some root loss through the winter season. These plants can recover, but are slower to produce growth in the spring, because they are "catching up" on root growth.
     Don't delay — get your last mowing in on a dry day. Automatic sprinkler systems should be turned off and drained this month, so they are not damaged by freezing temperatures.
     In her new book Garden to Vase, Portland professional florist Linda Beutler shows us how easy it is to brighten our homes with floral arrangements. Hear her talk "Garden to Vase: Fresh and Fearless" at the Master Gardener 9th Annual Gardening Symposium, Winter Dreams-Summer Gardens, at 9 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 3, at Southern Oregon University. Register early, deadline: Oct. 31. Call the Oregon State University Extension Office: 776-7371.
     Composting with Worms: Oregonians generate six pounds of household waste per person every day. Reduce that waste using a worm bin and reap the bonus of nutrient-rich castings for your houseplants or garden. North Mountain Park Nature Center, 7 to 8 p.m., Nov. 7. Cost $3. Call 488-6606.
     Learn about gaining more time to enjoy your garden with low-maintenance landscaping ideas from Bonnie Bayard. Also at North Mountain Park Nature Center, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Nov. 14. Cost $12.
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