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  • It's all about the pendulum for David Fisse.
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    • David Fisse.
      Age: 63.
      Job title: President of Northwest Design and Drafting.
      Job description: Building designer and water dowser.
      Salary: $250 per dowsing job, with a 100 percent refund guaranteed if h...
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      David Fisse.
      Age: 63.

      Job title: President of Northwest Design and Drafting.

      Job description: Building designer and water dowser.

      Salary: $250 per dowsing job, with a 100 percent refund guaranteed if he is not accurate to within 25 percent for depth and volume.

      Education: Graduated from high school.

      How long at the job: First started dowsing 15 years ago.

      If you could have your dream job today, what would it be? Using dowsing for locating noxious earth energy to reduce cancer.
  • It's all about the pendulum for David Fisse.
    Fisse's life has taken several career paths, but it was his curiosity that led him into the ancient craft of dowsing.
    The pendulum — a small, stainless-steel device weighing just a few ounces — has become Fisse's dowsing instrument of choice.
    About 15 years ago, Fisse observed some utility workers on Holly Street in downtown Medford looking for a water line using a pair of L-rods, 3-foot lengths of welding iron bent six inches at a 90-degree angle.
    Fisse — curious at what he was seeing — approached the workers and said, "Hey, let me try."
    The 63-year-old owner of Northwest Design and Drafting in Medford became intrigued when "the L-rods crossed every time I crossed the water line."
    This initial experience catapulted Fisse into the unexplainable realm of dowsing.
    At first, Fisse unsuccessfully tried to cash in on his newly discovered skill using L-rods to mine for gold along the Salmon River in Northern California.
    "I was really interested in finding gold," says Fisse, "but I never had any luck. Water I'm good at, gold I'm not."
    Fisse's pursuit of learning the craft was furthered through a chance meeting a couple of years later at his home-show booth at the Medford Armory. This is where Fisse became acquainted with his dowsing mentor, professor "Meech" Meecham.
    Meecham, a retired aerospace engineer who has since passed away, had dowsed several hundred wells in this area, according to Fisse.
    Over a period of years, Meecham took Fisse along on dowsing jobs. Fisse watched as the old master discovered water on different properties. Meecham also turned Fisse on to the pendulum.
    "He told me anyone can dowse," says Fisse. "He showed me you could dowse for more than water. But he didn't have a lot of answers for me."
    The pendulum Fisse uses has about a four-inch chain with a plumb-bob-shaped piece of stainless steel on the bottom.
    "A pendulum is small and I can carry it in my watch pocket," says Fisse. "But the instrument can be anything. It can be a (candy) lifesaver on a string."
    When Fisse looks for water on a property, the first thing he wants to know is where the septic system is located because a 100-foot clearance is necessary. Also, he looks for a place that is level enough to allow a well-drilling rig access.
    He's learned that crossing his legs or being close to any metal will affect the accuracy of his dowsing.
    "I walk with the pendulum swinging back and forth," explains Fisse. "When I come across a water vein, the pendulum will go left-to-right."
    Once a vein is found, Fisse follows the vein to a spot where it crosses another vein. Another lesson Fisse has learned is to not stand right over the vein or it will throw off his estimations.
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