Labor Day — summer's last hurrah. Time to take some time off from the daily drudgery. No more cubicles, no more meetings, no more tapping on Blackberries, no more chattering on cell phones. It's time to unplug. It's time to get your family in the car, packed with gear and tents and a cooler of treats. It's time for camping.

Labor Day — summer's last hurrah. Time to take some time off from the daily drudgery. No more cubicles, no more meetings, no more tapping on Blackberries, no more chattering on cell phones. It's time to unplug. It's time to get your family in the car, packed with gear and tents and a cooler of treats. It's time for camping.

And where will you break out of your daily living and into the warm laze of summer? Where will you sit in front of a crackling fire at twilight, the kids roasting marshmallows as the crickets begin their singing? Whether it's a tent or RV, the following are three great campgrounds that you might have overlooked.

MT. RAINIER NATIONAL PARK

Standing amidst towering Douglas firs, western red cedars and western hemlocks can be a humbling experience. There they have been for hundreds of years — before the Civil War, before American Independence, before Plymouth Rock — and yet they still stand, taller and growing. Humbling, exciting, enchanting, delightful, these are the sorts of terms that could be used to describe Ohanapecosh, a campground in the southeast corner of Mount Rainier National Park.

With a visitor center, picnic areas and oodles of trails nearby, Ohanapecosh is a nice option away from the hustle and bustle of the more popular (crowded) areas of Longmire and Paradise. The eastside of the park is drier and sunnier than those more popular spots as well. Instead of crowded trails and packed campgrounds where the drizzle falls, Ohanapecosh is that warm woodsy haven you're looking for.

FORT STEVENS STATE PARK

If the mountains don't suit you, Oregon's beachside campgrounds are plentiful. Take, for instance, one of the best at Fort Stevens State Park near Astoria. It has everything a family might want to do to relax or for adventure. The 3,700-acre park offers beachcombing, a freshwater lake ready to be rippled with the oars of a canoe, historical exhibits and a shipwreck, the Peter Iredale, that you can walk up to if the tide is out.

WALLOWA LAKE STATE PARK

Birdwatching and more can be found in Oregon's Wallowa Lake State Park. Surrounded by snow-capped mountains and nestled near a morainal lake formed 9 million years ago (talk about history), the park, near the artsy community of Joseph, famed for its bronze works, is a place of solitude where the beauty of Eastern Oregon can find its way into any visitor.