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MailTribune.com
  • Recession romance

    Life is difficult, but don't let it ruin your relationship, says an expert; there are ways to keep the flame alive cheaply
  • Life is difficult, but don't let it ruin your relationship, says an expert; there are ways to keep the flame alive cheaply.
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  • Christina and Kevin Moran don't want to stop dating.
    After more than 10 years of marriage, they're still crazy about each other. Despite the pressures that come from raising five kids and running a small business, they're all about keeping things romantic.
    With a recession raging, though, it isn't easy. Expenses that many married couples considered basic a year ago — dropping $50 on a Friday night baby sitter, buying each other impromptu gifts, planning weekends away sans-kids — are being eliminated.
    Couples lying awake at night wondering whether they'll survive the next round of layoffs probably don't have romance on their minds. These days, "the very last thing on that list of priorities is physical connection," says author and marriage therapist Michele Weiner-Davis.
    And yet, the same pressures that have Americans cutting back on expenses — rising costs, fear of losing a job, panic over dwindling savings — make it especially vital for couples to stay connected, especially with Valentine's Day coming Feb. 14. Under siege, people need all the benefits that a strong relationship can bring.
    So how can cash-conscious couples make sure their marriage isn't a casualty of the economic crisis?
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