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MailTribune.com
  • Long process of recovery for Medford woman with H1N1 virus

  • A Medford woman suffering from the H1N1 virus who was taken to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center in Portland last month has been upgraded from critical to serious condition, a hospital spokeswoman said Tuesday afternoon.
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  • A Medford woman suffering from the H1N1 virus who was taken to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center in Portland last month has been upgraded from critical to serious condition, a hospital spokeswoman said Tuesday afternoon.
    Jacquelyn Cordero, 30, had been transferred in mid-October to Portland to be placed on a special extracorporeal membrane oxygenation machine after spending a week in intensive care at a Medford hospital. There are no ECMOs available at hospitals in Jackson or Josephine counties. The machines provide both cardiac and respiratory support to patients whose heart and lungs are so severely diseased or damaged that they no longer function.
    Cordero, the daughter of Johnny and Carolyn Cordero of Medford, has no health insurance. Friends have established the Jacquelyn Cordero Medical Fund at Bank of America.
    Her father, pastor of the Lamb's Home Fellowship in Medford, reported via e-mail on Sunday that his daughter has been "off the bypass machine for three days and seems to be holding well." However, she remains on a ventilator and is a long way from full recovery, he added.
    Friends of Jacquelyn Cordero can leave messages for her at www.caringbridge.org/visit/jacquelyncordero/journal.
    Since Sept. 1, 745 Oregonians in 30 counties have been hospitalized with influenza-like illness, according to the Oregon Public Health Division. Of those, 20 have died.
    Meanwhile, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta said Tuesday that a cumulative total of about 327,700 H1N1 influenza vaccine doses will have arrived in Oregon by Friday, enough to vaccinate 16.7 percent of the priority groups.
    Those groups include pregnant women, children and young people from six months to 24 years, those 24 to 65 with underlying health conditions; people caring for infants six months and younger and health care, emergency and frontline law enforcement officers. In Oregon, priority groups account for about half the state's population.
    "We have a plan to get through the flu season, no matter when the vaccine arrives," said Dr. Mel Kohn, the health division director, in a prepared statement. "We've been working on this plan for eight years. We are ready."
    Because the H1N1 flu season is expected to last well into the spring, the vaccine will be helpful whenever it arrives, he said.
    "We have systems in place to keep track of the virus in Oregon and can send resources to where they're needed," he said, noting that the division has activated its emergency operations center full-time to respond to swine flu issues.
    To avoid getting the flu or spreading it, he urges everyone to wash their hands frequently, cover their coughs and stay home when they are sick.
    For more information on H1N1 flu and vaccines, call the Oregon Public Health Flu Hotline at 1-800-978-3040 or visit www.flu.oregon.gov.
    Reach reporter Paul Fattig at 776-4496 or e-mail him at pfattig@mailtribune.com.
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