When she decided to reform the traditional, rectangular yoga mat, Desiree Kleemann turned to someone who works outside the box.

When she decided to reform the traditional, rectangular yoga mat, Desiree Kleemann turned to someone who works outside the box.

Kleemann's brother, 50-year-old Joe Kleemann, devised a way to cut polyurethane yoga mats in 6-foot-diameter circles at his garage in Eagle Point.

More than a year and hundreds of mats later, the Kleemanns have a trademark for Mandala Yoga Mats, which allow a wider range of movement than rectangular mats.

"I was the one that came up with the idea, and he made it happen," said 48-year-old Desiree Kleemann, who owns a yoga studio in Point Roberts, Wash.

With a massive mat on their hands, the siblings recently had to design a bag large enough to carry it. Joe Kleemann's solution is a rectangular satchel that measures about 24 by 20 inches to hold a folded, rather than rolled, Mandala mat.

Like the mats (priced at $69), the $44 bags can be purchased online at www.mandalayogamat.com.

The simple concept would challenge do-it-yourselfers to maneuver the heavy rolls of material that make Mandala mats, Desiree Kleemann said. That didn't stop YogaAccessories.com from copying her design, she said, and dropping the price by $5 apiece.

"You can't patent a shape," she said.