JACKSONVILLE — A local version of PBS' popular "Antiques Roadshow" — without the TV cameras — draws crowds of folks interested in knowing more about their treasures when it's held the second Monday of each month.

JACKSONVILLE — A local version of PBS' popular "Antiques Roadshow" — without the TV cameras — draws crowds of folks interested in knowing more about their treasures when it's held the second Monday of each month.

Jacksonville Barn Company, an antiques and home decor store, held its first "What's It Worth Appraisal Day" in February. Demand was so great that appraiser Steve Wall stayed until 6 p.m., two hours past the scheduled close. The next event will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. Monday at the business at 150 S. Oregon St.

"Everyone just kind of hangs out and sees what others bring, and what Steve has to say," said John Buda, co-owner of the store. "We just want to have ... something fun for the community to do. We want to keep it on a day when it doesn't get too busy."

About 45 people brought antiques on the two days that had good weather, while 30 showed up on a rainy day, said Buda. He said he hopes to get the events televised on public access RVTV at a later date.

Wall, an auctioneer who frequently deals with antiques, was impressed by original photos of American Indians from around 1900 during April's show. Two sisters from the Applegate Valley brought in the collection, which had been taken by their great-grandfather, a photographer in Arizona.

"Some of them were on reservations. Some were in native dress and others were in American dress," said Wall. "Just to have those original photographs of someone who documented Native Americans is unusual. There's not a lot of these around, and they are highly collectable."

Individually the photos, about 5-by-7 inches in size each, would be worth between $300 to $500 at an auction, he estimated. But the collection's value is even greater because there were letters and other artifacts.

"The one thing that's interesting with them and with other materials is if there's provenance that actually links that particular item or artifact to the owner in a verifiable way," said Wall. "If it comes down through the family, that gives a conclusive attribute to its provenance."

Items he's reviewed have ranged in size from small jewelry to vases and a Civil War-era desk valued at $1,200 to $1,400.

"Some folks came in with an early-20th century lamp that was kind of a Tiffany-style with a brass base; not a Tiffany but a contemporary," said Wall. "That was a nice piece, probably worth $2,000 to $3,000."

One woman learned that the baffling copper device she had was a samovar, a tea-brewing device from Russia. The 1910 object is worth about $300, said Wall.

Photographs are common at the event, but not always valuable. Many individuals don't realize the picture they have is a reproduction print and not an original that might have more worth.

Old family photographs aren't worth as much as others that might show the Civil War, construction of buildings or railroads or anything with early bikes and motorcycles, said Wall. He brings a laptop computer to the event to help determine values.

"It's fun because you never know what's out there, and people's stories are interesting," said Wall, who donates his services.

A sign-up sheet is available the day of the event and participants are asked to limit themselves to one item. There's no charge for appraisals. More information is available by calling 541-702-0307 or on the Web at www.jacksonvillebarnco.com.

Tony Boom is a freelance writer living in Ashland. Reach him at tboomwriter@gmail.com.