|
|
|
MailTribune.com
  • Home Remedy

    Let your home feed your soul
  • Feeling like your love life is not all it could be? Needing work that satisfies your soul? Looking to find a new level of joy and harmony in your family? Maybe your house — with a little boost from the principles of feng shui — can help.
    • email print
    • Recommended reading
      "Interior Design With Feng Shui" by Sarah Rossbach
      "Living Color: Master Lin Yun's Guide to Feng Shui and the Art of Color," by Sarah Rossbach.
      "Move Your Stuff, Change Your Life" by Kar...
      » Read more
      X
      Recommended reading
      "Interior Design With Feng Shui" by Sarah Rossbach

      "Living Color: Master Lin Yun's Guide to Feng Shui and the Art of Color," by Sarah Rossbach.

      "Move Your Stuff, Change Your Life" by Karen Rauch Carter.
  • Feeling like your love life is not all it could be? Needing work that satisfies your soul? Looking to find a new level of joy and harmony in your family? Maybe your house — with a little boost from the principles of feng shui — can help.
    "Feng shui (pronounced fung shway) is a way of looking at how energy flows within a place," says Ashland feng shui consultant Melanie Marx, who helps clients align the energy in their home or workplace to create more well-being, health, prosperity or balance.
    "I believe that our homes are an extension of who we are," says feng shui professional Sharon Wilson, an Applegate resident who helps clients connect with what they want in their lives, and then helps them create a home that supports those desires.
    There are many sects of feng shui. The most widely practiced in the United States is known as "Black Hat." At the heart of Black Hat feng shui is an octagonal diagram, called the bagua, which has its inception in the "I Ching," the Chinese book of changes.
    The bagua is superimposed over the floor plan of a building. Each wall, or gua, as well as the center of the bagua, is associated with a particular area of life: career and life path; skills and knowledge; family; prosperity; relationships; creativity; travel; and health.
    Each gua corresponds to particular colors, shapes, elements, numbers, body parts and creative and destructive items. The energy, or "chi," of one gua works with the chi of all of the others to create a harmonious (or inharmonious) flow of energy. Feng shui practitioners believe that flow can help or hinder the vitality and opportunity available to the resident of the home or building.
    Placement changes that are made within a house or building are called "cures" or "remedies."
    Marx studies a building's floor plan and then talks with the client. Based on that study and dialog, she prescribes "cures" that will help heal and realign the chi within the three-dimensional space.
    Her coaching also helps clients make cognitive or emotional adjustments that might support them in receiving the incoming flow of good.
    "We have a propensity to match our energy with the houses that we live in," says Marx. "Therefore, when the energy of a home changes for the better, we need to upgrade our ability to match it."
    Wilson often is called in when people are setting up new businesses. Among her goals are helping a business attract clients and allowing those clients to feel comfortable and trusting.
    "We clear out the old and bring in the new," Wilson says. "I want people to succeed."
    When Kimberly Chaquico of Ashland moved to the Rogue Valley, she knew she wanted a new start for her family. She contacted a feng shui practitioner to come in and do a "space clearing" in their recently purchased home.
    "I didn't tell my husband that I was doing this," Chaquico says. "He had no idea. After the clearing, he walked into our house and said it felt completely different. After that I was convinced, and so was he."
    Chaquico decided to take some courses in feng shui principles, and for the past nine years she and her family have regularly applied those principles.
Reader Reaction

      calendar