• Farmer Fresh

    Lessons from the farm are entering Rogue Valley kitchens
  • The Internet provides the only connection Mark and Sandy Brown need to sign up for weekly deliveries of fresh, locally grown vegetables, fruit, even meat. The Jacksonville couple joined two community-supported agriculture programs with just a few keyboard clicks.
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    • If you go
      What: Farm to Fork, a dinner series featuring local foods on the farms and ranches that grew and produced them. A portion of proceeds benefit Rogue Valley Farm to School and Friends of Family Farme...
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      If you go
      What: Farm to Fork, a dinner series featuring local foods on the farms and ranches that grew and produced them. A portion of proceeds benefit Rogue Valley Farm to School and Friends of Family Farmers. Events are planned on Saturdays and begin at 4:30 p.m. Tickets are $60, but additional donations are encouraged.

      When & Where: June 26, Dunbar Farms, 612 Pierce Road, Medford; July 31, Restoration Farm, 1133 Old Siskiyou Highway, Ashland; Aug. 28, Happy Dirt Veggie Patch, 100 Eagle Mill Road, Ashland; Sept. 11, Blackberry Lane, 2926 Lower River Road, Grants Pass; Oct. 9, Rogue Valley Brambles, 6764 Tarry Lane, Talent; Nov. 6, to be announced.

      For more information and reservations: See the website www.farmtoforkevents.com or call 503-473-3952.

      For a list of local community-supported agriculture programs, see the Mail Tribune's Eat Local Challenge page at www.mailtribune.com/eatlocal

      A guide to Rogue Valley food producers is published and distributed by THRIVE, a local nonprofit economic-development and advocacy group. Pick up a guide at one of 30 participating locations throughout Jackson and Josephine counties or download a copy at www.buylocalrogue.org.
  • The Internet provides the only connection Mark and Sandy Brown need to sign up for weekly deliveries of fresh, locally grown vegetables, fruit, even meat. The Jacksonville couple joined two community-supported agriculture programs with just a few keyboard clicks.
    "Most of 'em have really good Web interfaces," says 47-year-old Mark Brown.
    To understand how their food was grown and harvested, the Browns could read local farmers' blogs or "friend" the farms on Facebook, but the couple put aside technology for a centuries-old form of networking — the barn dance. With 5-year-old son CJ in tow, the Browns and more than 100 other local families spent a May afternoon at Central Point's Hanley Farm eating chili and cornbread, stomping their feet to fiddling, touring the fields by horse-drawn wagon and meeting their farmers.
    "You want your kids to learn where the food comes from, that it's not just what you buy at the grocery store," says 41-year-old Sandy Brown.
    Local farmers are more than happy to teach that lesson and increasingly interact with customers outside growers markets.
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