|
|
|
MailTribune.com
  • Heavens Above

    The sky above Crater Lake explodes with wonder as stargazers gather for party; Perseid meteor shower is next
  • Although she's been visiting Crater Lake for more than 30 years, Marianne Edmunds is still star-struck by the national park's nighttime sky.
    • email print
    • IF YOU GO
      What: Perseid meteor shower star party with volunteers from Crater Lake National Park and Crater Lake National Park Trust; telescopes provided; bring warm clothing, folding chairs and blankets; cos...
      » Read more
      X
      IF YOU GO
      What: Perseid meteor shower star party with volunteers from Crater Lake National Park and Crater Lake National Park Trust; telescopes provided; bring warm clothing, folding chairs and blankets; cost is $20 for adults, $10 for children younger than 13.

      When: 10 p.m. to 11:55 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 14

      Where: Crater Lake rim near national park visitor's center

      For more information and to register: See the website www.craterlaketrust.org or call Maria Clementi at 541-708-5125.
  • Although she's been visiting Crater Lake for more than 30 years, Marianne Edmunds is still star-struck by the national park's nighttime sky.
    "Wow, wow, wow," exclaims the 54-year-old resident of Pollock Pines, Calif. "This is like National Geographic coming to life."
    Telescopes and interpretive discussions opened the heavens above Crater Lake Saturday to participants in the first of two "star parties" planned this summer. The next, on Saturday, Aug. 14, coincides with the Perseid meteor shower, an annual celestial spectacle when the Earth's solar orbit carries it through a cloud of dust particles left by an old comet's tail.
    "This is becoming popular in all our national parks," says Tom McDonough, a park interpretive ranger who's been volunteering there for more than 40 years. "We can have 100 people who show up.
    "Kids'll stay up until midnight," he adds. "The enthusiasm is just contagious."
    A warm-up for August's main event, Saturday's gathering of about a dozen visitors was light despite ideal star-gazing conditions. Once the sun had fully set at 10:30 p.m., mosquitoes fled and cool temperatures encouraged warm clothing.
    "Tonight will be the sky at its best," says McDonough, who also teaches astronomy, physics and oceanography at Chemeketa Community College in Salem. "There's no wind; it's dead-calm.
    "Most people are coming from urban areas, so this is just brand-brand-new to them."
Reader Reaction
      • calendar