• Working your dark meat

    Good posture does more than make us look better — it's important to long-term health
  • You know you should work on having good posture. It requires less energy, and it works against problems such as arthritis by keeping nerve pathways unhampered.
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  • You know you should work on having good posture. It requires less energy, and it works against problems such as arthritis by keeping nerve pathways unhampered.
    But how does one get good posture?
    Well, the first thing to do is sit up straight.
    It's hard to keep pulling yourself out of a slouch, but — sorry — that's the main "exercise" for good posture, says Ashland chiropractor Mark Machala, who teaches posture classes at Ashland Food Co-op.
    Sitting up straight provides a good workout for the core postural muscles on the front and back of your body, says Machala.
    It may seem amazing, but most people don't know how to sit up straight, says Machala.
    It sounds simple enough. You just lift up your body by the breast bone until your ear holes (without tipping your head back) are above your shoulders. If your chair has a back, push your pelvis up against it and let the curve of your spine (in the waist area) be free of the chair. The upper back may touch the chair. In this position, you're asking the muscles along your spine to work.
    To strengthen the core postural muscles on the front of your body, just hold a light level of tension in your abdomen. You can slap your tummy lightly to activate that level of tension. This works out the abdomen, diaphragm and pelvic floor.
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