• The body talks

  • Her ministrations don't look like much to the casual observer, but for Bruce Kellogg, Janet Rueger is a "miracle worker."
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    • HEALING VETERANS
      Returning Veterans Project is a nonprofit organization of politically unaffiliated, independent, health care practitioners offering free and confidential services to veterans of the Iraq and Afghan...
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      HEALING VETERANS
      Returning Veterans Project is a nonprofit organization of politically unaffiliated, independent, health care practitioners offering free and confidential services to veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan campaigns, as well as their families.

      Volunteers include mental-health professionals, acupuncturists, naturopaths, chiropractors, physicians, massage therapists and other complementary health care providers in Oregon and Washington. Veterans and their families can locate providers according to city at www.returningveterans.org. Providers can download applications to volunteer from the site.
  • Her ministrations don't look like much to the casual observer, but for Bruce Kellogg, Janet Rueger is a "miracle worker."
    Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury — including migraines — plagued the U.S. Army veteran when he came to Rueger, an Ashland chiropractor, on a local acupuncturist's referral. Rueger realized Kellogg, 50, would benefit not only from chiropractic work, but from an alternative therapy known as BodyTalk.
    "Post-traumatic stress disorder is totally up the alley of BodyTalk," says Rueger. "Nothing traditional seems to work with these vibrational frequency injuries."
    Since a mortar round exploded near him in Iraq — the impact's effects soon after exacerbated by pressure inside an aircraft — Kellogg sought treatment for pain and cognitive difficulties, which mainstream medicine simply haven't alleviated. Because veteran's medical benefits didn't cover his appointment at a local pain clinic, Kellogg says he paid $400 for an appointment and another $100 for prescription medications. However, the treatment only dulled his migraines — but not the fire in his sciatic nerve — and did nothing to piece his mind back together.
    "They treat the symptoms," says Kellogg. "They don't really treat the injury."
    A Portland-based nonprofit group, Returning Veterans Project, gave Kellogg options for complementary therapies usually not covered by insurance. Both Rueger and Medford acupuncturist Teresa Bresnan volunteer their services through the organization.
    "I thought, gosh, with BodyTalk, I could help them," says Rueger.
    The 60-year-old chiropractor has been practicing BodyTalk since 2002 after it solved some of her own health conundrums, including headaches, digestive discomfort, chronic fatigue and general aches and pains. The method was developed by Australian chiropractor and acupuncturist John Veltheim, who with his wife, Esther Veltheim, founded the International BodyTalk Association in 2000. The privately held, worldwide company headquartered in Sarasota, Fla., conducts seminars to train and certify its members, according to its website, www.bodytalksystem.com.
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