• Boulder busters

    bouldering is taking rock climbing to new heights
  • It doesn't require as much investment in ropes and other related gear, rapport with a partner or the time required to climb hundreds of feet. Yet down-to-earth "bouldering" is taking the sport of rock climbing to new heights.
    • email print
    • Local indoor rock-climbing facilities
      Rogue Rock Gym, at 3001 Samike Drive, Suite 104, Medford is open from noon to 9 p.m. weekdays and from noon to 6 p.m. Saturdays until October, when closing is at 10 p.m. weekdays, and Saturday and ...
      » Read more
      X
      Local indoor rock-climbing facilities
      Rogue Rock Gym, at 3001 Samike Drive, Suite 104, Medford is open from noon to 9 p.m. weekdays and from noon to 6 p.m. Saturdays until October, when closing is at 10 p.m. weekdays, and Saturday and Sunday hours are from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. through the winter and spring. Day passes cost $12, $10 for students, and equipment is available to rent. See www.roguerockgym.com for monthly and annual membership fees or call 541-245-2665.

      Rogue Valley Family YMCA, at 522 W. Sixth St., Medford, has rock-climbing and bouldering walls open to Y members and guests from 4 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. See www.rvymca.org or call 541-772-6295 for additional times and information.

      Club Northwest, 2160 N.W. Vine St., Grants Pass, has a self-belaying, rock-climbing structure open to certified members during club hours. See www.clubnw.com/rockclimbing.html or call 541-955-2582.

      Southern Oregon University has a rock-climbing wall inside a former racquetball court behind McNeal Pavilion on the Ashland campus, 1250 Siskiyou Blvd. Students can obtain term or year passes. Call the SOU Outdoor Program at 541-552-6470 for more information.
  • It doesn't require as much investment in ropes and other related gear, rapport with a partner or the time required to climb hundreds of feet. Yet down-to-earth "bouldering" is taking the sport of rock climbing to new heights.
    "Anybody can boulder," says Matt Lambert, owner of Rogue Rock Gym.
    All it takes is some tight-fitting footwear, maybe a dusting of chalk for the hands and a desire to tackle the bumpy, creased, pockmarked face of an unyielding rock — hanging upside-down if need be — to reach its squat summit. Although the climb is shorter, bouldering often feels more intense than scaling a rock face twice as high, says Lambert. It can be more social, with several climbers attempting the same route in quick succession, or suited to solitary climbing, which typically isn't recommended for rope-dependent ascents.
Reader Reaction