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  • The woman in the trunk

  • My most memorable journeys have been those punctuated by stories of people I've met along the way. This one happened at It's a Burl in Kerby.
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  • My most memorable journeys have been those punctuated by stories of people I've met along the way. This one happened at It's a Burl in Kerby.
    I almost drove right by the hodgepodge of wood carvings piled along the roadside and the tall strange structure that spewed purple waters into a frothy pool. But I'm glad I didn't. It was a treasure-trove of art and artists, one of whom was Robert Marconkowski.
    Oblivious to the people milling around him and the giant fly buzzing in his ear, Robert buried his head in the cloud of sawdust billowing from his chainsaw. Peering into the trunk of a dead cedar, he was looking at something. Moving closer, I hovered.
    He was carving out a woman who stretched from the trunk. Slender yet voluptuous, the woman seemed to rise out of the wood — tall and confident, looking upward, letting her curls fall toward her hips.
    Robert didn't see me. It was more his need for a cigarette than my breath on his neck that finally had him turning off his saw and noticing me.
    "How do you do that freestyle?" I asked.
    "It's not me. It's her," he said, waving his saw toward the trunk. "She's been in there all (the) time. I'm just letting her out."
    When I asked him to tell me about her, he set down the chainsaw, lit a cigarette and told me a story that went like this:
    "The story doesn't start with her," he said. "It begins with her friend.
    "The friend is walking through the woods one day. She is thinking, meditating, praying "… whatever "… for her friend. They've been friends a long time.
    "And then she sees this dead tree in the middle of a forest full of live trees. 'Not fair,' she thinks. 'All these beautiful trees continue to live, but not this one? Not fair.'
    "The tree reminds her of the friend for whom she's been sending up good thoughts. It's not fair. When everyone around her is alive, why should her friend be dying? Life is not fair.
    "The friend circles the dead tree, thinking angry thoughts about life, about cancer, about death. And then she notices what used to be the joint where a strong limb grew out of the trunk. The joint is now a gnarly, empty socket; no strong limb there anymore. But there was something else: a tiny green sapling, stubbornly holding onto life, refusing to give into death.
    "The woman's despair turned to hope. It happened in that one moment. So she brings the trunk to me and says, 'Make something for my friend.'
    "So I looked very hard and very deep inside this trunk. I looked for a very long time, trying to see her, to listen to her. The more I looked, the clearer I could see her. She was in there, struggling to come out and say something. She wanted to say something to this cancer that was trying to kill her.
    "Look at her! Can you hear her? She's looking up, head held high in confidence, breasts anew in victory. And she's yelling out, as loud as she can: '#%@!# cancer! You may kill my body, but not my spirit!' "
    Taking one last puff, Robert put out his cigarette and picked up his saw.
    "The best part of the story," he said, "is that the friend went into remission while I've been working on this."
    Freelance writer Fylvia Fowler Kline lives in Medford. She is vice president of communications and programs at The Chamber of Medford/Jackson County. She writes a blog at fylvia.wordpress.com.
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