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MailTribune.com
  • Cheapo caching

  • Tromping down the Bear Creek Greenway one recent afternoon, Talent residents Heiland Hoff and Lisa Purcell were oblivious to frigid temperatures as they forged past trash heaps and blackberry bushes.
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    • The Ubiquitous Usufructors are hoping a Facebook page will offer a place for fans to check in and share their tales of treasure hunting.
      They've outlined a handful of adventures with clues and i...
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      The Ubiquitous Usufructors are hoping a Facebook page will offer a place for fans to check in and share their tales of treasure hunting.

      They've outlined a handful of adventures with clues and instructions clear enough to bypass high-tech gadgets. Clues such as "walk 100 paces" or "watch for a ruby-red slipper" replace map coordinates and satellite images.

      They're also hoping participants will create their own adventures to share.

      The first cheapo-caching adventure centers behind the Medford Railroad Park while a second has been set up at the Stearns Cemetery in Talent.



      For information, see

      facebook.com/pages/Ubiquitous-Usufructors/245438315519840
  • Tromping down the Bear Creek Greenway one recent afternoon, Talent residents Heiland Hoff and Lisa Purcell were oblivious to frigid temperatures as they forged past trash heaps and blackberry bushes.
    With a 150-pound Great Dane named Maus (pronounced "mouse") leading the charge, they were eagerly replenishing clues from their newly invented pastime of "cheapo-caching."
    Based loosely on geocaching, a globally popular treasure-hunting game that utilizes Global Positioning System technology, this is a low-tech version for tightwads who don't want to buy a GPS unit.
    It all started on a Saturday when Hoff and Purcell planned to spend a day trying to find local geocaches and quickly ran into a snag.
    Hoff is no stranger to snake handling, camping under the stars and even hunting bears, so Purcell assumed he would have a GPS unit. A local architect, Hoff figured Purcell would have one. In a twist of fate that would spawn a new take on geocaching, both were wrong.
    "He has every other piece of outdoor-adventure equipment known to man," exclaims Purcell. "Seriously. He could start his own REI (store). I don't know how it is that he, of all people, did not have a GPS."
    Still gung-ho about a day of exploring, the pair hid a series of small, plastic, clue-bearing containers and trinkets between the Greenway and Railroad Park near Table Rock Road.
    As excited "as two 9-year-olds," says Purcell, they posted the first clue about their cache on Craigslist and signed it "Boris and Doris, the Ubiquitous Usufructors," a name spawned by the quirky clues and the notion of gently trespassing on open land.
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