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MailTribune.com
  • Jacksonville council approves 2012-13 budget

    It's up $95,000 this year; property owners will pay same tax rate as last year
  • JACKSONVILLE — The town's budget for fiscal year 2012-13, approved by the City Council earlier this month, is up $95,000 over the current one, with no large capital projects or personnel changes planned.
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  • JACKSONVILLE — The town's budget for fiscal year 2012-13, approved by the City Council earlier this month, is up $95,000 over the current one, with no large capital projects or personnel changes planned.
    Jacksonville property owners will be assessed at a rate of $1.84 per $1,000 of valuation, the maximum allowed under Oregon law and the same rate as last year.
    Property taxes will produce $640,860 for the budget. Another $208,902 will be assessed for bonded indebtedness above the allowable rate. The total budget is $6,804,899, compared to the 2011-12 budget of $6,709,404.
    Efforts to restrain spending are reflected in the budget, said City Administrator Jeff Alvis. All funds have achieved a goal of carrying a 10 percent unappropriated balance.
    "Plus, we're beginning to develop reserves," said Alvis. "We're actually going to have a decent total of reserves in all funds."
    Personnel costs will total $1,608,782 in the coming year. The city has 22 full-time and two part-time employees. Revisions in city staffing were made last year, and no new hires are planned this year.
    Materials and services for all departments will cost $1,738,766. Those expenses cover everything from office paper to consultant fees.
    Capital outlays are targeted at $1,724,506, but much of that is money held in reserve for emergencies in several funds, said Alvis.
    A portion of the $395,000 capital outlay allocation for streets and storm drains may be spent on storm drain work for a street project in the area of First and Main streets. An estimate of that cost has not yet been established, said Alvis.
    Materials and services in the Historic Preservation Fund are budgeted at $544,000, but much of that is held in reserve. If the roof of the city-owned, 1855 Brunner Building collapsed, for example, the repairs could be made, said Alvis.
    Grant funds available for historic preservation were upped from $35,000 to $50,000. The program provides a 50 percent match for property owners who apply for assistance when they make repairs or perform maintenance on historic structures.
    "We are getting a lot of activity arising on historic preservation," said Alvis.
    Reach freelance writer Tony Boom at tboomwriter@gmail.com.
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