• R.I.P.P.E.D.

    High-intensity interval training gets results
  • The workout combines the best principles and focus of all the workouts, says Y senior program director Andy Eck. "You're maximizing your time (on the floor) while getting the most results. The workout crosses over into everyday life, mimicking exercises you do in daily life."
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  • The workout combines the best principles and focus of all the workouts, says Y senior program director Andy Eck. "You're maximizing your time (on the floor) while getting the most results. The workout crosses over into everyday life, mimicking exercises you do in daily life."
    While RIPPED may sound like an intimidating workout for fit, buff athletes, it's not like that at all, says Eck, noting it's good for overweight people or those who need cardiopulmonary workouts to improve heart health.
    "Whatever your goal, you should be able to achieve it with this class," says Eck.
    "It's geared to any age, shape or condition," adds Layton.
    The diet component is "paleo" — a popular nutrition approach seen in many programs these days — focusing on lean proteins, fruits and vegetables while steering away from foods unknown to cavemen. These are eggs, cheese, dairy, simple carbs, sugars or grains (especially refined grains).
    Jake Porras of Rogue Valley CrossFit has worked the concepts at intervals into his classes. He notes that CrossFit has many skill sets, including cardio, respiration, strength, speed, flexibility, endurance, coordination, stamina, power, agility and balance.
    "We train at varying intensities, sometimes a long and slow race or with sprints, as you see in track and field, with soccer being a good example of blending a lot of sprints and stops."
    HIIT, says Porras, partners intense performance with intervals of low intensity or rest.
    "An advantage of having intervals, periods of high intensity followed by reduced intensity, is the ability for your energy systems to recover, which in turn allows your body to perform the bouts of high intensity more effectively than without a recovery period.
    "With this, you increase the overall value of a workout session in less time. The scientific benefits of HIIT are improved VO2 max (maximum oxygen volume taken in), improved anaerobic capacity as well as aerobic capacity, improved metabolism, and some research indicates improvement in cardiovascular-disease risk factors."
    Using HIIT, Porras says he's seen "tremendous" benefits, even with traditional endurance athletes.
    Layton plans a RIPPED-type class three times per week, dates to be announced at www.ashlandymca.org.
    RIPPED classes are offered at Oz Fitness in Medford three times a week. For details, see www.ozfitness.com/clubs_schedule.php?clubs_id=9
    Rogue Valley CrossFit offers information at www.roguevalleycrossfit.com
    For more information about RIPPED, which is billed as a "plateau-proof fitness formula," see www.rippedusa.com.
    John Darling is a freelance writer living in Ashland. Email him at jdarling@jeffnet.org.
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