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MailTribune.com
  • 105: No record high but, yes, it was hot enough for us

  • Triple digits, a delight to some and scourge to others, hit the Rogue Valley airport at 1:48 p.m. Saturday, ending the second-longest recorded streak of days without a 100-degree Fahrenheit recording.
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  • Triple digits, a delight to some and scourge to others, hit the Rogue Valley airport at 1:48 p.m. Saturday, ending the second-longest recorded streak of days without a 100-degree Fahrenheit recording.
    A sign of the times, the National Weather Service office in Medford posted on its Facebook page when the official reading hit 100 degrees.
    "At 1:48 p.m. and 25 seconds, Medford officially recorded 100 degrees for the first time in 709 days," the Facebook post read. "Stay hydrated, and enjoy the summer!"
    Medford airport wasn't the hottest spot in the valley, however.
    Outlying areas such as Buckhorn Springs and recording posts in the hills between Grants Pass and Medford crested above the century mark around noon and kept going, the NWS reported.
    The temperature at the Medford airport hit 105 degrees at 4:53 p.m., still three degrees under the record of 108 degrees recorded on that date in 1998, while a weather station reading on the I-5 viaduct recorded 107 degrees at 5:19 p.m.
    Temperatures soared into the triple digits across much of Western Oregon on Saturday, and forecasters said more hot weather was in store for Sunday. By 5 p.m. Saturday, temperatures reached 102 in Portland and Salem, 101 in Eugene and 100 in The Dalles.
    Temperatures last invaded triple digits in Medford on Aug. 25, 2010. The 709-day streak is the second-longest on record, eclipsed only by a 732-day run that ended July 25, 1958.
    The Weather Service warned that thunderstorms and lightening were possible today.
    Isolated thunderstorms ... will become more numerous Sunday, first reaching Northern California, then spreading into Oregon," the NWS reported. "Gusty winds and hail are possible in stronger storms; seek shelter when you first hear thunder or see lightning. Storms may initially contain little to no rainfall, and lightning strikes may spark new fires in dry timber and grasses. With the recent hot weather and potential for lightning, the fire danger will be high on Sunday."
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