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MailTribune.com
  • I-5 stretch has better safety stats

  • I don't understand why the powers that be found it necessary to post the freeway between exits 27 and 30 at 55 mph, but since they did, I really don't understand why they don't enforce the speed limit. They could make a small fortune just in those three miles. I travel between 55 and 59 mph through there and always have to be...
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  • I don't understand why the powers that be found it necessary to post the freeway between exits 27 and 30 at 55 mph, but since they did, I really don't understand why they don't enforce the speed limit. They could make a small fortune just in those three miles. I travel between 55 and 59 mph through there and always have to be in the right lane so people can go flying by me at 65 or 70, or even faster. It just doesn't make sense.
    — No name given
    Au contraire, Mr. or Ms. No Name, police say there is a very good reason that you see very few tickets being handed out there.
    According to police, the reason police presence on that stretch of Interstate 5 seems so scarce is because the fatality and injury statistics are low.
    "It isn't an area, so to speak, that we focus on," said Lt. Kelly Collins of the Oregon State Police.
    Where you will see an increased presence is along Highway 140 and the first 15 miles or so of I-5 north of the California border. The likelihood of injury and fatal crashes are far higher there, Collins added, meaning an increased police presence is necessary to encourage slower driving.
    "For us, that's what it boils down to," Collins said, adding revenue is never the priority. "We go where people are dying or getting hurt. We want to make sure we reduce the number of injury and fatal traffic crashes."
    He added that tickets certainly do get written between the two exits you mentioned, but that most motorists slow down when police are seen.
    While that stretch of freeway is within the city of Medford, Medford police do not patrol it. They do respond to assist other officers or if there's an emergency, but do not stand watch for speeders there, according to MPD Lt. Mike Budreau.
    Email questions to youasked@mailtribune.com.
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