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MailTribune.com
  • Best deal in town

    Success led Rogue Book Exchange to find a new, bigger space in Medford
  • Chuck Casale hauls five paper sacks of books into a quaint storefront on North Ivy Street in Medford, the new home of the five-year-old Rogue Book Exchange. It's a place where locals can donate and receive books and other forms of media for free. Casale has utilized the store to reduce what once was a 10,000-book collection down to a meager 2,000.
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    • you can help
      In addition to donations of cash, books, movies and music, the Rogue Book
      Exchange wish-list includes beanbag chairs for a newly created children's area and a child-sized table-and-chair set.
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      you can help
      In addition to donations of cash, books, movies and music, the Rogue Book

      Exchange wish-list includes beanbag chairs for a newly created children's area and a child-sized table-and-chair set.

      Where: 100 N. Ivy St., Medford

      Phone: 541-779-1326

      Online: www.roguebooks.org

      Email: roguebookexchange@gmail.com
  • Chuck Casale hauls five paper sacks of books into a quaint storefront on North Ivy Street in Medford, the new home of the five-year-old Rogue Book Exchange. It's a place where locals can donate and receive books and other forms of media for free. Casale has utilized the store to reduce what once was a 10,000-book collection down to a meager 2,000.
    "It's terrific. I come in. I donate books, and I usually take more back than I bring in," he says.
    "Of course, when I'm done with those, I take them back and get more."
    One of 50-plus visitors per day, minimum, Casale says the nonprofit store is a welcoming place with an appealing business model.
    Created in 2007 after a $23 million budget shortfall closed local libraries for six months, the store offers an inexpensive way for local residents to share — by donating, receiving and even returning yet again — books, music and movies.
    The concept puts media in the hands of those who need or want it and keeps materials out of landfills. While Jackson County ultimately outsourced library operations to a Maryland company and was able to reopen the county's 15 branches with limited hours, the store has thrived, growing larger each year.
    Open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, the store is accessible to downtown foot traffic and, says store manager Margaret Parker, is a friendly, not-library-silent atmosphere.
    Once housed in a 1,500-square-foot warehouse along Biddle, with no windows and limited space, the book exchange eased into its new, 3,200-square-foot digs in early August.
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