Neil Young isn't the only rocker vying for readers this fall. Here's a look at a few other musical memoirs:

Neil Young isn't the only rocker vying for readers this fall. Here's a look at a few other musical memoirs:

"Who I Am" by Pete Townshend; HarperCollins (544 pages, $32.50): The Who mastermind has served for decades as one of rock's most fearless seekers, and in this long-anticipated book he plunges headlong into red-letter episodes including Who bassist John Entwistle's unexpected 2002 death and Townshend's 2003 arrest on child-pornography charges (he was later cleared). "In the Pleasure Groove: Love, Death & Duran Duran" by John Taylor; Dutton (387 pages, $27.95): Unlike most cred-obsessed rockers, the Duran Duran bassist presents his (and the band's) story as one of substance in the service of style. "Cyndi Lauper: A Memoir" by Cyndi Lauper, with Jancee Dunn Atria (338 pages, $26): One of the MTV generation's first superstars, Lauper is still best known for bouncy early-'80s hits such as "She Bop." Here, though, she traces her music — in no-nonsense language — back to a chaotic childhood streaked with abuse. "Coal to Diamonds: A Memoir" by Beth Ditto, with Michelle Tea; Spiegel & Grau (176 pages, $22): This Arkansas-born belter leads Gossip, a fiery disco-punk trio whose cult-fave renown seems not quite to justify a memoir. Aware of that, perhaps, Ditto's tone vacillates curiously between bildungsroman and kaffeeklatsch.