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  • Study reveals FBS coaches remain mostly white, male

  • ORLANDO, Fla. — A study of the racial and gender makeup of leadership and coaching positions among the Football Bowl Subdivision membership showed it remains largely white and male.
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  • ORLANDO, Fla. — A study of the racial and gender makeup of leadership and coaching positions among the Football Bowl Subdivision membership showed it remains largely white and male.
    The report released Wednesday by the Institute for the Diversity and Ethics in Sport at the University of Central Florida said that 100 percent of FBS conference commissioners, 76 percent of school president positions and 84 percent of all athletic director positions were held by white men at the beginning of the 2012-13 academic year.
    It also showed a decline in the percentage of women in campus leadership positions with a slight increase in the representation of people of color, especially for Latinos and Asians.
    Among the FBS' 120 institutions, there were 18 minority head coaches to begin the season, down from an all-time high of 19 last year. That total included 14 African-Americans, two Latinos and two Asians.
    "For me as somebody who has worked on college campus for 30-plus years it's especially discouraging that in terms of hiring practices are far behind the professional levels," said primary study author Richard Lapchick. "I would have hoped that colleges would have at least kept pace, but they are clearly behind in hiring practices."
    For the position of faculty athletics representative, 94.4 percent are white and 31.7 percent are women.
    According to 2011 data compiled by the Chronicle of Higher Education, 6.3 percent of full-time faculty members are Asian, which is 1.2 percentage points less than the 2007 data reported in last year's study. African-American and Latino faculty members have grown by 1.6 and 0.6 percentage points respectively, to seven and 4.2 percent. Forty-seven percent are women.
    For coaches, the study's numbers don't reflect the recent dismissals of Joker Phillips at Kentucky, and Jon Embree from the University of Colorado, who drew attention to the poor rehire rate for minority coaches.
    During his final news conference earlier this week, Embree hinted at a double standard for African-American hires after they are fired from a head coaching job.
    Tyrone Willingham is the only African-American coach to be hired for another head coaching job (by Washington in 2005) after having been fired (by Notre Dame in 2004).
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