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MailTribune.com
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • Two thumbs up for Medford's mayor and council for investing in safety. Since the early '90s, Medford's armored cars were donations of vehicles being retired. These vehicles are now more than 30 years old. Two of these vehicles had ballistic ratings to stop only handguns and were not capable of stopping rounds from hunting and assault rifles. Officers wear body armor that has to be replaced every five years.
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  • Two thumbs up for Medford's mayor and council for investing in safety. Since the early '90s, Medford's armored cars were donations of vehicles being retired. These vehicles are now more than 30 years old. Two of these vehicles had ballistic ratings to stop only handguns and were not capable of stopping rounds from hunting and assault rifles. Officers wear body armor that has to be replaced every five years.
    Fortunately, MPD has not had its body armor tested by criminals in more than 20 years, yet the city still invested in this safety equipment. During a 20-year period, the department will spend more than $300,000 on protective vests. The city recognizes the top priority is to provide for the safety of its citizens, and to do so must equip and provide for the safety of its officers.
    The forecasts for the next decade is increased violence. The city would be negligent and liable to knowingly expect and send its officers into harm's way without providing them the needed protection against the common weaponry that exists on today's streets. The new armored vehicle is an investment in safety and MPD's ability to willingly go into harm's way to save others. — Randy Schoen, Central Point
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