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MailTribune.com
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • Yes, our hearts are broken, too, for the children and families in Newtown, Conn., but it will take more than good thoughts, prayers, hugs and tears to remedy this national tragedy.
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  • Yes, our hearts are broken, too, for the children and families in Newtown, Conn., but it will take more than good thoughts, prayers, hugs and tears to remedy this national tragedy.
    We need to start a conversation, have a courageous debate and produce a workable action plan. For a start, we need to reinstate the 1994 ban on the manufacture of military style assault weapons.
    Don't blame President Obama for this. Blame Gabby Giffords' shooting in Arizona, the theater shooting in Aurora, Colo, the Sikh temple shooting, the Clackamas Town Center shooting and now this in Connecticut.
    Geez, Louise, c'mon, Obama. — Dan Heath, Medford
    In November, by the use of scare techniques, agribusiness got the people of California to defeat a proposition that would have required labeling on any agricultural product that contained GMOs. The proposition did not require a warning label, nor did it restrict the use of genetically modified organisms. It only required that the consumer be allowed to know what he or she is buying and eating.
    It seems since we the consumers pay the bills, we should have a right to know what we are buying and not be told that we are not smart enough to make our own buying decisions.
    Now it is the World Trade Organization telling us, the paying consumer, that we don't have the right to know if the tuna we buy is caught in a manner protecting dolphins (MT, Dec. 2).
    We do have the right to know. We will not have this right, though, if we do not stand up for it and allow the WTO to run roughshod over our ecological and safety standards, bringing everything down to the lowest common denominator. This is one we should write our representatives on. — Bill Mcwhorter, Medford
    I find it hard to believe that all of the new electronics, movies, Black Friday, are so important to people that they need to loiter out in front of businesses and theaters dressed as hobbits and such.
    Are these things and events so important that people have to get instant gratification, or is it that they need the attention so badly?
    People these days seem to place more importance on tattoos, piercings, gadgets and 15 minutes of fame than anything else. A shooter in Connecticut just got his 15 minutes of fame by killing himself and about 20 other people. — Russ DeClusin, Medford
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