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MailTribune.com
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • The 'Cliff fallout' article (Jan. 3) provided a well-detailed explanation of how the Social Security payroll tax works and how an end to its temporary reduction will impact wage earners. In my opinion, this is a positive change, but I'm disappointed that the article didn't connect the dots.
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  • The 'Cliff fallout' article (Jan. 3) provided a well-detailed explanation of how the Social Security payroll tax works and how an end to its temporary reduction will impact wage earners. In my opinion, this is a positive change, but I'm disappointed that the article didn't connect the dots.
    As originally conceived, the SSA payroll tax was reduced in order to put more consumer money into the economy. It was a dubious decision, but it played well for politicians.
    The obvious result has been a reduction in the amount of direct contributions going into the Social Security Fund. Question: didn't this give more ammo to those who claim the fund is faltering?
    During the next few months we can expect SSA/Medicare to come under attack under "entitlement reform," despite not affecting the budget. The programs will be used as "bargaining chips" by both parties.
    The "chained CPI" formula is already familiar to us, but other erosive ideas are also being floated.
    I urge everyone to contact their U.S. legislators and demand an end to using SSA/Medicare as budgetary "playthings." We have all paid into these programs and are fully entitled to what is rightfully ours. — Andrew Kubik, Ashland
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