Carmakers let app developers drive innovation

Goal is for consoles to integrate features on your smartphone
An industry affiliate tests out Ford's SYNC connection and entertainment system inside a Ford Fusion at the Consumer Electronics Show, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013, in Las Vegas. Ford's SYNC connects the car stereo and navigation system to a user's mobile device. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)AP

LAS VEGAS — Googling the nearest gas station, sending email from your smartphone, or booking a table at a restaurant: Those are all things you shouldn't do while driving. But so many drivers have grown accustomed to their on-the-go tasks that automakers are increasingly trying to make those things easier to pull off with both hands on the wheel and both eyes on the road.

As General Motors and Ford commissioned ideas from application makers this week, the possibilities for what you can do with your vehicle's steering wheel buttons, microphone, speakers and internal gauges are quickly expanding.

How would you like to choose your favorite tune by simply uttering the song's title, turn your car into a mobile Wi-Fi hotspot, or respond to an ad you hear on the radio without lifting a finger?

At the International CES show, General Motors and Ford launched programs that will open their designs to developers, inviting them to create software applications for future car models. It's a relatively new strategy for carmakers, but one that many gadget manufacturers employ, including Apple, which did it for the original iPhone in 2007.

The programs free the automakers from having to keep pace with new technologies by tying the functionality of their cars' internal systems to advances in smartphones.

Ford Motor Co.'s app developer program, called Sync AppLink, "is a way for (the company) not to worry about the next big app," said product manager Julius Marchwicki.

General Motors Co. said its framework "gives developers a whole new sandbox, with wheels."

In some ways, though, the current systems inside cars have a long ways to go to provide the functionality that smartphones have offered for years.

For instance, in a demo of Ford's new integration with music service Rhapsody, you can wirelessly sync your phone with the car and listen to playlists you have already created by pressing the voice button on the steering wheel and saying "play playlist 1."

But you can't just choose a track by voice on a whim, which is part of what makes these unlimited streaming plans attractive even at $10 a month.

Saying "Bruno Mars" to your Ford car won't pull up "Locked Out of Heaven," although typing it on Rhapsody's website or smartphone app can.

The same is true of Pandora's radio app in Ford cars.

The company plans to improve the car's ability to respond to voice commands that cover a wider range of search terms and speech in AppLink 2.0, which is expected out by September of this year, said C.J. King, development engineer for AppLink.

General Motors showed off its new relationship with Apple's Siri voice assistant, which is newly integrated in some of its cars including the Chevy Spark. Siri, however, only linked up to the car's speaker and microphone and didn't offer access to the car's inner systems.

Rhapsody CEO Jon Irwin said that it's really just the beginning for automakers to work more closely with high-tech content providers.

"This is the first step in what's going to be a really exciting year," Irwin said. "As that technology evolves, you'll see it get better and better."


Reader Reaction
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Rules. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or fill out this form. New comments are only accepted for two weeks from the date of publication.
COUPON OF THE WEEK