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MailTribune.com
  • Looking Back

    Central Point resident Linda Genaw made herself into a historian
  • An effort to preserve stories from her own family history put Gold Hill native Linda Morehouse Genaw on the road to becoming a writer and local historian.
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    • Works by Linda Genaw
      "Gold Hill and its Neighbors Along the River" (107 pages)
      "At the Crossroads: A History of Central Point, 1850-1900" (124 pages)
      "Rock Point Pioneer & I.O.O.F. Cemeteries," with special secti...
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      Works by Linda Genaw
      "Gold Hill and its Neighbors Along the River" (107 pages)

      "At the Crossroads: A History of Central Point, 1850-1900" (124 pages)

      "Rock Point Pioneer & I.O.O.F. Cemeteries," with special section that includes Hays/Gall Cemetery (332 pages)

      "Gleanings from the Gold Hill News, 1910-1912" (164 pages)

      "Gleanings from the Gold Hill News, 1913-1914" (128 pages)

      "Gleanings from the Gold Hill News, 1915-1916" (210 pages)

      "Gleanings from the Gold Hill News, 1917-1921" (106 pages)

      "Gleanings from the Gold Hill News, 1926-1927" (161 pages)

      "The Chavner Homeplace" (booklet)

      "The Gold Hill Hotel" (booklet)

      "A Brief Look at the History and Significance of Gold Hill Schools" (booklet)

      "Gold, Gold, Gold: A Story by Lester Foley" (booklet)

      Three dozen copies from a second printing of "At the Crossroads: A History of Central Point" are available for $30 per copy. For information, call Genaw at 541-821-4879.
  • An effort to preserve stories from her own family history put Gold Hill native Linda Morehouse Genaw on the road to becoming a writer and local historian.
    Indeed, it was the stories passed down from her ancestors that nudged Genaw into researching her own family background and the history of the communities where she grew up.
    Writer of a dozen historical volumes on local towns, cemeteries and schools, Genaw got hooked on history at a young age after hearing pioneer tales about her great-great-grandmother walking alongside a wagon train from Missouri to Oregon in 1853.
    Genaw says pride in her Oregonian roots and the desire to leave something for her children prompted her to record the things she learned.
    "By the time I had my first child in 1976, my family had been in Oregon 123 years, and Oregon had only been a state for 117 of those years," she points out.
    Finding very little history about her hometown, where she lived for 38 years, she decided to track down and record the information herself.
    "I lived on part of the ranch that Tom Chavner had. He donated the land that became the city of Gold Hill, so I started there," Genaw says.
    "That was strange because I had always felt connected to the land and old homestead house that is still on the old property."
    In the early 1980s, Genaw visited with Thomas Chavner's grandson, Chavner Thompson, who lived on what remained of the once massive ranch. A sucker for historical tales, Genaw would talk to Chavner whenever the opportunity arose.
    "He was a funny guy. I would stop by and talk to him when I would see him in the yard, and we would chat about whatever was on his mind," she says.
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