|
|
|
MailTribune.com
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • I was in the military and in the inauguration parade in 1953. I believe it set a record for the longest-running parade on record. We lined up at 11 a.m., and I was in the seventh division of a nine-division parade. When we passed the White House the floodlights were on. We broke up shortly after passing, and I watched the rest of the parade on TV in a local bar.
    • email print
      Comment
  • I was in the military and in the inauguration parade in 1953. I believe it set a record for the longest-running parade on record. We lined up at 11 a.m., and I was in the seventh division of a nine-division parade. When we passed the White House the floodlights were on. We broke up shortly after passing, and I watched the rest of the parade on TV in a local bar.
    One of the reasons of the length of it was, I heard that the 82nd Airborne Division was passing through Washington, D.C., and they put the whole division in the parade. I don't know if that is true or not. I think after this parade that they limited the length of the parades. — William C. Carlson, Central Point
    I was dismayed to read in Friday's Tempo a TV review reflecting several outdated biases toward women.
    The review of "The Bachelor" by Betsy Hart stated that "women love to over-romanticize relationships." While this may be true of some women, it is also true of some men. In addition, the piece by Hart states that women should not pursue men, that "what is shown to work over the long term (is a) man pursuing a woman." Enough said.
    Because some women as well as some men are subject to reality TV's squalid lures is no excuse to turn back the clock on progress by resuscitating harmful stereotypes. I would ask that the editors of our local newspaper take more care in winnowing out opinion pieces masquerading as reviews. — Leslie Morgan, Medford
    Having had dealings with Sheriff Winters, I have found him to be less than responsive to his constituents' complaints and therefore find his recent utterances not out of character.
    Now the latest "bon mot" out of his mouth is that he will adjudicate and decide whether or not he will follow the law of the land if passed by Congress, and if it's constitutional regarding outlawing assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition clips. I really was unaware that he had a constitutional law degree and is a constitutional scholar. What hubris!
    As an elected official he took an oath to uphold the "law of the land;" if he does what he's threatening to do, I believe that would constitute "neglect of duty" and be grounds for a recall. — Yale Sacks, Central Point
    At what point were law enforcement officers given the right to choose which laws to enforce?
    Bad show, Sheriff Mike Winters. Bad example. Bad judgment. If you want to create laws, run for Congress. — Carol Jo Pettit, Talent
    I am pleased to see Sheriff Winters is not going to let the feds make federal criminals out of Jackson County gun owners. No sir, he's not going to enforce federal laws restricting the rights of law-abiding Oregonians to own guns. Not on his watch! The feds had better stay out of his county! No federal gun laws for him.
    Unless, of course, the gun laws affect Oregonians registered with the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program — then he'll spend whatever it takes to get the guns out of their hands and pretend that it's his sacred duty to enforce federal gun laws.
    And you can bet that Winters will battle endlessly to keep the feds out of his county. Unless, of course, they are arresting marijuana growers registered with the OMMP, then he'll direct traffic for them so they don't get lost in the wilds of Jackson County.
    I am sure Winters would rather you not notice this embarrassing conflict between his two positions on Oregonians' guns, but he shouldn't care. Winters should be just as proud to wear the yellow badge of the hypocrite as he is to wear that tin sheriff's star. He worked so hard to get it. — Laird Funk, Williams
    What is with Sheriff Winters' ridiculous statement about "protecting legal gun owners" from losing their weapons as long as he is sheriff? We don't need that kind of posturing when we have a serious debate going on about common-sense gun regulation! He is using a too common (frequently Republican) technique of sowing fear where none is warranted.
    He is not Wyatt Earp, nor any other frontier sheriff. He is one of many enforcers of our laws — as determined by legally constituted authorities and vetted by the courts. He does not serve the electorate well by implying that legal gun ownership is threatened by any announcement from the White House regarding common-sense gun regulation. Remember, the operative word is "legal!"
    Neither he nor I nor any other responsible gun owner need worry about forfeiture as long as we abide by the law; the Second Amendment is not going away. But — there are real issues of liability, registration, and sheer firepower that need addressing.
    Isn't it strange? As more powerful weapons enter the market, the more prevalent mass shootings become? It might make a thinking person take another look at this terrible situation we are in. — Kathleen Heritage, Rogue River
    Great job on the article describing the looming consequences of dishonesty and corruption for New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin. I'm curious why his political affiliation wasn't mentioned. You do realize he's a Democrat, I'm sure. — Bob Waldo, Medford
    This week in Central Point shows what can happen when a community rallies together. Through a Central Point Facebook page, people were asked to support its local warming station for the homeless by dropping off pizzas, hats, socks and gloves for the 30 people who use this station. Within one hour, 42 pizzas had been delivered along with hats, gloves and socks for all 30 people.
    Then last Saturday through the same Facebook page, the community was asked to support our first Cash Mob. The community was asked to patronize Bobbio's Pizza in Central Point as a new owner took over, changed things up and needed the support. The community came out in droves to support the restaurant.
    Community support is so important, and I am so proud to say that I live in this unique little town that truly has come together as a community! — Debbie Saxbury, Central Point
Reader Reaction

      calendar