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MailTribune.com
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • The Rachel Rice story told in the Mail Tribune is just one of many life stories told of the mentally ill. This article tells of those fighting the inherited mental illness diseases. With closed mental health hospitals, caregivers have few options. A three-day hospitalization is not a curing solution.
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  • The Rachel Rice story told in the Mail Tribune is just one of many life stories told of the mentally ill. This article tells of those fighting the inherited mental illness diseases. With closed mental health hospitals, caregivers have few options. A three-day hospitalization is not a curing solution.
    The revolving door mentioned in the article shows how the mentally ill go from arrest to a three-day hospitalization, back to the same life, sometimes to the street, only to re-enter the same cycle. These adults in episodes can't take care of themselves. Most have a family member to help them, but those struggling from day to day cannot cope with their diseases alone.
    One local organization, the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Southern Oregon, helps those afflicted and the caregiver by offering education, a mental health library open to the public and support groups for the mentally ill and caregivers. NAMI-Southern Oregon advocates for the mental health court and clubhouse proposals. This all-volunteer organization may be contacted at 541-774-8772 or P.O. Box 8018, Medford, OR 97501. — Vern Weaver, former president, NAMI-Southern Oregon and former director of the Hawthorne Center
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