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MailTribune.com
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • In Tombstone in 1881 it was illegal to carry a firearm within city limits. Incoming cowboys checked their guns at a livery or saloon. On their way out of town, visitors could retrieve their weapons (Tombstone was Apache territory). Because the Clantons (cornered in a vacant lot, not the OK Corral) were on their way out of tow...
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  • In Tombstone in 1881 it was illegal to carry a firearm within city limits. Incoming cowboys checked their guns at a livery or saloon. On their way out of town, visitors could retrieve their weapons (Tombstone was Apache territory). Because the Clantons (cornered in a vacant lot, not the OK Corral) were on their way out of town, their guns were legal. The Earps and Doc Holliday (who before and after the shootout were only moderately less criminal than the Clantons) were attempting to disarm their opponents. Holliday, who had the worst record, possessed a city gun permit.
    Further context:
    Nobody has yet proposed a law that would have stopped the Newtown massacre — a law that would confiscate an already-purchased assault weapon from the mother of a discreetly insane child.
    In 1787, cannons and bayonets were the only weapons that governments possessed but the citizenry didn't. The guns that today's anti-government types insist are necessary to oppose tyranny are worthless against tanks, missiles, drones and tactical nukes.
    Founders' founder James Madison would be shocked that we're still using the Constitution he fathered; he saw the document as a stopgap compromise likely to last a generation. — Hunter Greer, Ashland
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