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MailTribune.com
  • February 15, 1913

  • SALEM — The Ashland Normal School Bill, providing for the submission of the re-establishment of the Ashland Normal School to the people in 1914, passed the house yesterday by a vote of 40 to 10. It is believed the bill will have easy sailing through the senate.
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  • SALEM — The Ashland Normal School Bill, providing for the submission of the re-establishment of the Ashland Normal School to the people in 1914, passed the house yesterday by a vote of 40 to 10. It is believed the bill will have easy sailing through the senate.
    "To avoid a row," the Senate committee on education is making a favorable report on the two bills providing for the submission to the people at the next general election the question of the re-establishment of the old Southern Oregon Normal at Ashland and the Normal at Weston in Eastern Oregon.
    "We are not making this report because we believe in it, but because it will avoid a row, both in the committee and out," said Senator Hawley, chairman of the committee.
    Early in the session Representative Hinkle of Umatilla County introduced a bill providing for the turning over to the Weston School District all of the old normal school property, but a little later when Senator Von der Hellen introduced a bill to re-establish the Ashland Normal, Senator Barrett of Umatilla quickly followed with his bill to re-establish the Weston Normal.
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    Pity for his mental and physical condition, together with a reluctance on the part of the forestry service to prosecute, led to a commitment to the poor farm instead of the penitentiary of John Alexander, an aged prospector and packer who recently broke into two ranger cabins and stole a large amount of government supplies.
    Alexander is said to be mentally irresponsible and this in connection with his condition and story of privation led the officials to be lenient. Upon the showing made by District Attorney Kelly, Judge TouVelle committed Alexander to the poor farm.
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    Lloyd Porter, a 12-year-old boy who lives with his parents on a homestead above Butte Falls has set a record for big game killing which will be hard to equal by any boy of his age. Last week, according to Mr. Porter, who is in the city on business, the youngster killed a huge cougar which measured 10 feet, 11 inches from tip to tip.
    At Christmas Lloyd was presented with a 30-30 rifle and since that time has hunted considerably. Recently he ran across a fresh cougar track and trailed the brute for about three miles when he came up with it in a clearing. Two shots laid the cougar low.
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