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MailTribune.com
  • Going green: Replace your incandescent with the right bulb

  • Buying a light bulb used to be easy. And it used to be something you did several times a year.
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    • Choosing the right hue
      CFL and LED bulbs come in a variety of colors ("color temperature" is the correct term) that will really affect the look of the room you're illuminating.
      Here are your options, with tips on wha...
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      Choosing the right hue
      CFL and LED bulbs come in a variety of colors ("color temperature" is the correct term) that will really affect the look of the room you're illuminating.

      Here are your options, with tips on what will put each room of your home in the very best light.

      Soft white/

      Warm white

      Where to use: Living areas, bedrooms, dining spaces. This is the most common color temperature, and closest in color to the traditional incandescent bulb. Works well with earth tones like brown and tan.

      Cool white/Neutral/Bright white

      Where to use: Office and work areas. Fine for general lighting. Works well with neutral tones like gray and beige.

      Natural/Daylight

      Where to use: Reading areas or for display lighting. Complements bold colors like blues, greens and purples; shows color with the most accuracy.
  • Buying a light bulb used to be easy. And it used to be something you did several times a year.
    But now, "a lot of people are starting to look at light bulbs as an investment," says Jaclyn Pardini, a spokeswoman for Lowe's Home Improvement stores.
    The incandescent bulbs in wide use ever since Thomas Edison received a patent for his version in 1880 are being phased out. A federal law passed in 2007 ends incandescent manufacturing and importing in the U.S. by the end of 2014, though stores will be allowed to keep them on shelves until they're sold out.
    In their place are more energy-efficient replacements that come in a dizzying array of hues and shapes.
    But you'll want to choose carefully. Those CFLs might be with you for the next nine years or so. And if you spring for an LED bulb, you're really in it for the long haul.
    "From the time a child enters kindergarten to the time that they graduate from college, that bulb will still work," says Pardini of LEDs.
    So as those last incandescents flicker out in your lamps and light fixtures, how do you decide what will replace them? Read on:
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