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MailTribune.com
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • Yesterday I engaged in the annual ritual of planting flats of early season vegetables, but there was one packet of seeds I sadly couldn't bring myself to plant. They were the chard seeds I had gathered from my garden last fall. Knowing that there are GMO sugar beets growing one street away from our home, there is the very rea...
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  • Yesterday I engaged in the annual ritual of planting flats of early season vegetables, but there was one packet of seeds I sadly couldn't bring myself to plant. They were the chard seeds I had gathered from my garden last fall. Knowing that there are GMO sugar beets growing one street away from our home, there is the very real danger that my chard may now be genetically modified through cross-pollination with the GMO sugar beets.
    As the number of genetically engineered crops continues to grow, I become more concerned about how we can maintain the right of each of us to grow food for our families without fear of contamination by genetically modified pollens. It is becoming difficult to even buy seeds for certain crops that aren't genetically modified as large corporations patent their genetically modified creations and dominate the market.
    As I've heard it said, "He who controls the seed, controls the food, and he who controls the food, controls the world."
    I'd like to at least maintain control over my backyard. That is why I support the passage of Measure 15-119 to ban the cultivation of GMO crops in Jackson County. — Anna Cassilly, Ashland
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