|
|
|
MailTribune.com
  • Since You Asked: Stock is a base for broths

  • What's the difference between broth and stock?
    • email print
  • What's the difference between broth and stock?
    — Lee S., Medford
    Stock is the foundation of many types of dishes, including soup. The richest-tasting stocks start with roasted bones, either leftover or browned or roasted just for stock, although it's fine to use uncooked meat. Stocks also should be simmered for at least an hour, but preferably two or more.
    Broth is what this liquid is called when served on its own or as a vehicle for other ingredients, such as noodles or vegetables. The biggest difference between the two if purchasing them packaged is that broth is more highly seasoned than stock, so stick with low-sodium broths when you're buying commercially made.
    If you're short on time for making your own stock, you can pump up the flavor of store-bought stock with this recipe from "300 Sensational Soups," by Carla Snyder and Meredith Deeds.
Reader Reaction
      • calendar