|
|
|
MailTribune.com
  • March 9, 1913

  • During the past two or three days the post office and express office clerks in the city have been having the time of their lives with shipments of skunk hides. Trappers are beginning to make their annual shipments of the winter's catch, and highly scented offices are the result. So far as is known this is the first time skunk hides have ever been shipped by parcel post.
    • email print
  • During the past two or three days the post office and express office clerks in the city have been having the time of their lives with shipments of skunk hides. Trappers are beginning to make their annual shipments of the winter's catch, and highly scented offices are the result. So far as is known this is the first time skunk hides have ever been shipped by parcel post.
    The express company got the worst of the deal as Chief Deputy Fish and Game Commissioner Sam L. Sandry ordered shipments by express held in order that he might inspect them and determine whether any beaver hides were shipped or not.
    The opening of the packages added to the occasion in a great degree.
    u
    ASHLAND, Ore., March 9 — A public market for Ashland may be the outcome of suggestions made by Mayor Johnson at a recent meeting of the city council.
    Experiences of other towns along this line were cited and sentiment here favors making an experiment of the plan.
    u
    ASHLAND, Ore., March 9, — As a result of the city council prohibiting roller-skating on the streets of Ashland, a petition signed by 310 young girl suffragettes was presented to Mayor Johnson asking that they be permitted to skate on the side streets. The young suffragettes claim that the city council has no authority to prohibit their skating unless ordered by ordinance of which the city charter makes no provision.
    u
    A valuable horse was lost and William Walters, 16, had a very narrow escape from drowning when he attempted to ford Rogue River a short distance below Gold Ray yesterday afternoon.
    The horse stepped into a hole and, caught by the current, was swept away while young Walters succeeded in swimming out.
    Walters, when the horse first fell, grabbed the animal by the neck and it is believed that this is the reason the animal failed to regain its feet.
    The accident was witnessed by Leon Field of the city, who assisted Walters ashore. The horse was washed downstream several hundred yards. Walters resides in the Sams Valley district.
Reader Reaction
      • calendar