|
|
|
MailTribune.com
  • Crime on the rise

    Drugs, jail overcrowding, lack of services linked to increase in crime reports, law enforcement officials say
  • The numbers don't lie: Reported crime in Medford has shot up significantly the past six years.
    • email print
    • Consolidated incident reports: Type-1 crimes by...
      2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
      Homicide 1 1 2 2 5 6 5
      Rape 25 28 33 30 38 40 35
      Robbery 42 45 44 27 46 64 70
      Assault 1,039 1,095 1,103 1,168 1,378 1,338 1,580
      Burglary ...
      » Read more
      X
      Consolidated incident reports: Type-1 crimes by year
      2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

      Homicide 1 1 2 2 5 6 5

      Rape 25 28 33 30 38 40 35

      Robbery 42 45 44 27 46 64 70

      Assault 1,039 1,095 1,103 1,168 1,378 1,338 1,580

      Burglary 493 419 309 344 416 461 502

      Larceny/theft 3,190 2,803 2,604 2,704 2,925 3,586 3,885

      UUMV* 203 205 129 194 228 233 247

      Arson 39 53 37 51 39 48 49

      *unauthorized use of a motor vehicle

      Drug offenses by year

      2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

      1,105 904 892 1,063 1,498 1,651 1,914

      (Source: Chief Tim George, Medford police)

      Forced releases at the Jackson County Jail

      2010 2011 2012 2013 (to date)

      1,310 2,440 4,766 1,030

      (Source: Andrea Carlson, Jackson County Sheriff's Department)
  • The numbers don't lie: Reported crime in Medford has shot up significantly the past six years.
    According to data provided by Medford police, the amounts of all reported Type-1 crimes in 2012 — felony offenses that include homicides, robberies and assaults — have seen an increase in every category compared with 2006 numbers.
    In 2006, for example, 3,190 thefts were reported. By 2012, thefts had risen to 3,885. Robberies climbed from 42 in 2006 to 70 in 2012. There were 1,039 assaults in 2006; 1,580 in 2012.
    And so on.
    Law enforcement officials attribute the shift to several factors, including the increasing use of illegal drugs, jail overcrowding, and a decrease in substance abuse treatment and mental health services. It's a trend they expect will continue if steps aren't taken.
    "If you don't smack it when it starts happening, it will fester," Medford police Chief Tim George says.
    Hoping to prevent that festering, police and prosecutors are cracking down on gang and drug activity, keeping a law enforcement presence in public schools, and changing the way prosecutors handle repeat offenders.
Reader Reaction
      • calendar