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  • Arizona takes Harvard to school

  • SALT LAKE CITY — Sometimes, it's rough being the smartest guy in the room.
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  • SALT LAKE CITY — Sometimes, it's rough being the smartest guy in the room.
    Harvard freshman point guard Siyani Chambers knows.
    He'll be heading back to Harvard missing part of his front tooth — all part of a wicked basketball lesson provided by Arizona in a 74-51 crushing of the Crimson on Saturday in the NCAA tournament.
    Mark Lyons matched a career high with 27 points to lead the sixth-seeded Wildcats (27-7), who showed how a real basketball school does it when March rolls around.
    "The history of Arizona speaks for itself," coach Sean Miller said. "This time of year, we not only represent ourselves, but all the great players and teams of the past."
    This will be Arizona's 15th appearance in the Sweet 16. The Wildcats are heading to Los Angeles for a West Regional matchup against Sunday's winner between Ohio State and Iowa State.
    And Harvard — well, it's back to class, though Chambers may want to stop by the dentist's office first.
    "We got the rebound, we were on a fast break, I went in the air, came down, and before I knew it, my tooth was out," he said, in describing the inadvertent elbow he took early in the second half from Arizona guard Kevin Parrom.
    Luckily, teammate Christian Webster was on the ball. He walked over to retrieve the tooth fragment and hand it back to its owner.
    But there wasn't much to salvage by that point.
    Harvard (20-10) missed its first 13 shots and 20 of its first 22 while falling behind 30-9. The Ivy League champs, who shot 52 percent in their upset win over New Mexico on Thursday, made only 27 percent in this one.
    "We had some open opportunities early, and once we missed some, we kind of got our heads down and they took advantage of it," coach Tommy Amaker said.
    Laurent Rivard, the Canadian guard who made five 3-pointers in the upset Thursday, shot 1-for-6 this time. He missed two early, then shot two airballs in the second half and finished with three points.
    "They played me different than New Mexico did," Rivard said. "Stayed on me, forced us to finish inside. That changed the game."
    Indeed, this was nothing like Thursday, when the upset over a physically imposing New Mexico team riled up the Harvard twitterrati and sparked dreams of nets somehow being cut down with a slide rule.
    Yes, Amaker's program could be redefining what's possible in the Ivy League.
    But Arizona, a team that hasn't lost to an opponent outside of the Pac-12 this season, had too much height, too much speed, too much talent to be slowed by this Harvard team.
    "They pounced on us from the beginning," Webster said. "I think it took us by surprise how hard they played, how physical they were, their length and size and speed. From there, it was just an uphill battle."
    Marquette 74, Butler 72
    At Lexington, Ky., Vander Blue scored 19 second-half points to rally third-seeded Marquette out of another hole, and the Golden Eagles survived No. 6 Butlery to reach the round of 16 in the NCAA tournament.
    Like November's first meeting between the teams at the Maui Invitational, won 72-71 by Butler on Rotnei Clarke's buzzer-beating 3-pointer, this was a back-and-forth, high-intensity affair that came down to the final shot.
    Only this time, Butler missed.
    Syracuse 66, California 60
    At San Jose, Calif., C.J. Fair scored 18 points, James Southerland added 14 and fourth-seeded Syracuse survived a second-half drought of more than 12 minutes without a field goal to beat No. 12 seed California.
    The Orange (28-9) frustrated California with their zone defense to overcome a dismal shooting night when they made just 39 percent of their shots and missed 15 of 41 free throws.
    But it proved to be enough to send Syracuse to Washington, D.C., for the East Regional where the Orange will take on the winner of today's game between top-seeded Indiana and Temple on Thursday.
    Richard Solomon scored 22 points for the Golden Bears (21-12), who were trying to make it to the round of 16 for the first time in 16 years and just the third time since 1960.
    Louisville 82, Colorado State 56
    At Lexington, Ky., Russ Smith had another big night, leading four players in double figures with 27 points, and top-seeded Louisville is into the Midwest Region semifinals.
    The Cardinals put on a defensive clinic as they dismantled Colorado State. Louisville forced the eighth-seeded Rams into a season-high 20 turnovers, made Colton Iverson look as invisible as a 6-foot-10 guy can be and limited one of the nation's best rebounding teams to 24 boards, more than a dozen below their average.
    It was the 12th straight win for Louisville (31-5).
    Michigan State 70, Memphis 48
    At Auburn Hills, Mich., Gary Harris scored 16 of his career-high 23 points in the first half to help third-seeded Michigan State reach the round of 16 for the fifth time in six years.
    Michigan State (27-8) will play the winner of the Duke-Creighton game on Friday in the Midwest Regional semifinals.
    The Tigers (31-5) advanced in the NCAA tournament for the first time in Josh Pastner's four seasons. The Conference USA champions were eliminated in the third round because they struggled to stop Harris on the outside or his teammates inside all afternoon.
    Michigan 78, VCU 53
    At Auburn Hills, Mich., Mitch McGary had 21 points and 14 rebounds, and fourth-seeded Michigan breezed through Virginia Commonwealth's vaunted pressure with a clinical performance and advanced to the round of 16 for the first time since 1994.
    VCU (27-9) was relentless in a 46-point rout of Akron on Thursday night, but the Rams met their match against Michigan's cool-headed backcourt. Trey Burke and Tim Hardaway Jr. rarely looked rattled against VCU, and although Michigan (28-7) committed 12 turnovers, the Rams couldn't turn many of them into quick scoring opportunities.
    McGary, a 6-foot-10 freshman, set season highs in scoring and rebounding.
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