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MailTribune.com
  • Our Legacy in Brief / Robert Ruhl

  • Robert Ruhl wasn't afraid to fight. The publisher and editor of the Mail Tribune battled against the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s, and his editorial fight against a radical local movement called the Good Government Congress brought a Pulitzer Prize in 1934.
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  • Robert Ruhl wasn't afraid to fight. The publisher and editor of the Mail Tribune battled against the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s, and his editorial fight against a radical local movement called the Good Government Congress brought a Pulitzer Prize in 1934.
    Born in 1880 in Rockford, Ill., Ruhl graduated from Harvard College, where in 1903 he served on the staff of The Crimson with Franklin D. Roosevelt.
    After stints at the New York Globe and other Eastern papers, Ruhl moved west in 1909, landing a job at the Spokane Spokesman-Review before moving to Medford in 1911 to edit the paper that later became the Mail Tribune.
    Ruhl purchased the paper from George Putnam in 1929 and retired in the 1950s.
    Ruhl and his wife, Mabel, lived in San Francisco until his death in 1967.
    The annual Robert W. Ruhl Lecture Series at the University of Oregon honors Ruhl's contribution to Oregon journalism.
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