|
|
|
MailTribune.com
  • April 18, 1913

  • The recent visit of the circus proved of a permanent benefit to the city in one respect at least, for, according to Street Commissioner Patton it remedied a sewer which has been giving trouble throughout the winter. The jar of loading and unloading from the cars dislodged debris which has been choking the sewer and now storm water escapes freely where before it backed up and flooded the street.
    • email print
      Comment
  • The recent visit of the circus proved of a permanent benefit to the city in one respect at least, for, according to Street Commissioner Patton it remedied a sewer which has been giving trouble throughout the winter. The jar of loading and unloading from the cars dislodged debris which has been choking the sewer and now storm water escapes freely where before it backed up and flooded the street.
    Throughout the winter a sewer at the Southern Pacific crossing on Main Street has been choked. All efforts to clear it failed. It was believed that digging would have to be resorted to.
    Then came the circus.
    The work of loading and unloading the cars happened to be directly above the seat of trouble. It is presumed that the jarring of the earth started the debris clogging the sewer and opened the drain. At least that is the way Patton dopes it out.
    u
    The Portland Telegram of April 17 contains the following:
    "Efforts to prevent the confirmation of Clarence L. Reames, of Medford, as United States District Attorney for Oregon, have started. The matter may be taken up directly with President Wilson and with the attorney general, rather than with Senators Chamberlain and Lane, as the senators recommended Reames and would, naturally, see that he is confirmed.
    "The ground on which the opposition to Reames has developed is the report on his former connection with the legal department of the Southern Pacific, and the fact that the greatest land case in the west, the Oregon & California Land Grant case is still pending. A.E. Reames is a Southern Pacific attorney and another relative, William M. Colvig, has long been considered the representative of the railroad in Southern Oregon. C.L. Reames was an attorney for the Southern Pacific prior to his service in the legislature in January and he showed colleagues a letter wherein he resigned.
Reader Reaction

      calendar