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  • UPDATED: Second Boston bombing suspect is in custody

  • A 19-year-old college student wanted in the Boston Marathon bombings was taken into custody Friday evening after a manhunt that left the city virtually paralyzed and his older brother and accomplice dead.
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  • 6:20 p.m. A 19-year-old college student wanted in the Boston Marathon bombings was taken into custody Friday evening after a manhunt that left the city virtually paralyzed and his older brother and accomplice dead.
    Police announced via Twitter that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was in custody. They later wrote, “CAPTURED!!! The hunt is over. The search is done. The terror is over. And justice has won. Suspect in custody.”
    Tsarnaev’s brother, 26-year-old Tamerlan, was killed Friday in a furious attempt to escape police.
    Dzhokhar Tsarnaev had been holed up in a boat in a Watertown neighborhood. The crowd gathered near the scene let out a cheer when spectators saw officers clapping.
    “Everyone wants him alive,” said Kathleen Paolillo, a 27-year-old teacher who lives in Watertown.
    Boston Mayor Tom Menino tweeted “We got him,” along with a photo of the police commissioner speaking to him.
    4:20 p.m. The sound of gunfire has been reported in Watertown, Mass., where authorities have been searching for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings.
    Television footage is showing emergency and military vehicles speeding through town Friday evening.
    It wasn't immediately clear whether authorities had found 19-year-old college student Dzhokar Tsarnaev.
    Authorities are telling residents of the area to stay indoors.
    SWAT teams in armored vehicles swarmed the tense and locked-down streets of Boston and its suburbs all day today in an all-out hunt for the surviving Boston Marathon bombing suspect after his older brother died in a desperate getaway attempt.
    State Police Col. Timothy Alben said at a news conference that he believed 19-year-old college student Dzhokar Tsarnaev was still in Massachusetts because of his ties to the area. But authorities lifted the stay-indoors warning for people in the Boston area, and the transit system started running again by evening.
    "We can't continue to lock down an entire city or an entire state," Alben said. At the same time, he and other authorities warned that Tsarnaev is a killer and that people should be vigilant.
    Tsarnaev fled on foot after a furious overnight gun battle that left 200 spent rounds behind and after a wild car chase in which he and his brother hurled explosives at police, authorities said. His brother, 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev, died in the shootout, run over by his younger brother in a car as he lay wounded, according to investigators.
    During the overnight spasm of violence, the brothers also shot and killed an MIT policeman and severely wounded another officer, authorities said.
    Law enforcement officials and family members identified the brothers as ethnic Chechens who came to the U.S. from Russia. They lived near Boston and had been in the U.S. for about a decade, an uncle said.
    Around midday, as the manhunt dragged on, the suspects' uncle Ruslan Tsarni of Montgomery Village, Md., pleaded on television: "Dzhokhar, if you are alive, turn yourself in and ask for forgiveness."
    The search by thousands of law enforcement officers all but paralyzed the Boston area for much of the day. Officials shut down all mass transit, including Amtrak trains to New York, advised businesses not to open, and warned close to 1 million people in the entire city and some of its suburbs to stay inside and unlock their doors only for uniformed police.
    "We believe this man to be a terrorist," Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said. "We believe this to be a man who's come here to kill people."
    Some neighborhoods resembled a military encampment, with officers patrolling with guns drawn and aimed, residents peering nervously from windows and people near surrounded buildings spirited away.
    — Associated Press
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