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MailTribune.com
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • The world did not end the minute the "sequester cuts" went into effect. The president had to do something to cause angst and alarm among the population. Stand up like a man and admit that he'd made a mistake by putting the sequester on the table last year only to have his bluff called? No, he went immediately into attack/blame mode.
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  • The world did not end the minute the "sequester cuts" went into effect. The president had to do something to cause angst and alarm among the population. Stand up like a man and admit that he'd made a mistake by putting the sequester on the table last year only to have his bluff called? No, he went immediately into attack/blame mode.
    Of course it wasn't his "fault" that the Congress voted on his proposal, or let it become fact, it was those horrible Republicans. A plan to punish the great "unwashed" population. He would refuse to allow the "people" to tour their/his house ... that'll teach them to defy his will.
    When all that did was upset schoolchildren, he had to do something. Refuse to allow any of the government agencies to use their own judgment when it comes to handling their budgets. Force them to bend to his will, force the FAA to furlough air traffic controllers. Not sensibly, but all at once so that it disrupts the country.
    Never fear, the White House planned this. The sequester does not actually cut anything. It just slows down the increases. There is plenty of money; they just aren't "allowed" to use it. — P. Moran, Medford
    My wife and I own a house in Medford that we rent to her parents, ages 83 and 90. In December, we bought a used gas range from a used appliance dealer and had them install it. Within three days my mother-in-law found that it took 20 minutes to boil a small saucepan of water and thus was not functional.
    The dealer came out, adjusted something and said it was fixed. It was still not functional. Four months and 20 phone calls brought one call back that was abusive and inconsequential. Last week while we were in town, I dropped in on the dealer and was subjected to a screaming and threatening tirade by the owner.
    We had a repairman take the range to his shop and it was set up for propane, not natural gas — a simple fix that cost $185 and should have been caught by the dealer.
    The website www.dexknows.com showed us that there were three other complaints as blatant as ours against this dealer. Do your homework and save money.
    Don't support dishonest business. As ye sow, so shall ye reap. — Steve DeSart, Bend
    A couple months ago I read in the MT that the National Do Not Call Registry people have declared a victory in stopping annoying solicitation calls. I'm guessing that to make this claim they're going off the number of complaints submitted by people who've registered with them, which is very misleading.
    I'm sure there are a lot of people like me who, when registering their home and cell numbers with the Do No Call center had high hopes of stopping these calls. Like me, they went through all the trouble to go online and file a complaint with every call received only to find that they were wasting their time and nothing was being done to stop the telemarketers.
    We finally gave up and stopped reporting, so complaint numbers go down and victory is declared. I get at least a dozen calls a week at home and another 10 on my cellphone, most of which are from Google wanting me to buy a Web page. I cant help but wonder, in this time of budget shortfalls, why we keep feeding a government watchdog with a huge money appetite but no teeth. — Dan Meyer, Medford
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