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MailTribune.com
  • May 3, 1913

  • Simplicity is the keynote of the modern motor car, and simplicity is nowhere better exemplified than in Chalmers cars. Even men who have watched carefully the strides made in perfecting the automobile are forced to open their eyes in amazement when they compare the present-day machine with one of the vintage of 1908. The prog...
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  • Simplicity is the keynote of the modern motor car, and simplicity is nowhere better exemplified than in Chalmers cars. Even men who have watched carefully the strides made in perfecting the automobile are forced to open their eyes in amazement when they compare the present-day machine with one of the vintage of 1908. The progress has been so great that it is difficult to appreciate it. However, since the changes of the past year have been refinements more than anything new, it is reasonable to presume that the next few years will bring nothing of great importance to automobile design.
    "All unnecessary parts have been eliminated in the properly designed automobile of 1913, said Perry L. Ashcraft, Jr., the Chalmers representative. "As an example," he continued, "take the Chalmers '36'. It is typical of the modern motor cars because it is a standard by which automobile values in its cars are judged. One of the most commendable points about this car is its simplicity. Simplicity makes for durability, dependability, economy in maintenance and operation long life.
    "I can remember the time when there were hundreds of more parts to an automobile than used in the Chalmers of today. When you eliminate working parts, you cut down the cost of repairs, the cost of running the car and lengthen its life. It is not infrequent that you find Chalmers owners who have driven their car 75,000 and 100,000 miles and it still gives perfect service. The well-designed and properly constructed motor car should give long service; if it doesn't, there is something wrong.
    "It doesn't take an expert mechanic to run a Chalmers and make it run right. The person of ordinary motor experience can get just as good results out of the Chalmers as the expert. The beauty of the standard automobile of 1913 is that it is ready to run when you want it. There is no pleasure in having a car that will not give service all the time when it is properly taken care of.
    "Chalmers cars are simple all the way through. This even applies to the self-starter, in itself a complicated adjunct to the automobile proper. The Chalmers is mechanically cranked by an air device. This is entirely separate from the working parts of the car. It is the simplest kind imaginable. It is absolutely dependable. It does not affect any manner the motor or ignition system. That is the reason why it is acknowledged to be the most serviceable on the market."
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