|
|
|
MailTribune.com
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • Creationists are committed to forcing "Intelligent Design" into public-school curricula. If this were only an idiosyncratic and private element of personal faith, why should anyone care? Creationism is, however, a movement, one designed to weaken critical thought, diminish intellectual skepticism, mischaracterize scientific t...
    • email print
  • Creationists are committed to forcing "Intelligent Design" into public-school curricula. If this were only an idiosyncratic and private element of personal faith, why should anyone care? Creationism is, however, a movement, one designed to weaken critical thought, diminish intellectual skepticism, mischaracterize scientific theory and break down the separation of church and state to introduce theocratic criteria into government.
    Creationism's dull argument is, as is a blunt shovel to hard earth, inadequate for digging into the facts surrounding human existence to reveal the way things actually work. Hence, "Intelligent Design" has no technical or scientific value whatever.
    One or more theories underlie every scientific discipline, but none is absolute; some are better established than others, but each is subject to change with the advent of new information. Fundamentalism, however, is by its very nature absolute, admitting of no possibility of scriptural error.
    There is no room for theory in such dogmatically closed belief systems — neither Darwin's theory nor any other that may be seen to challenge its orthodoxy. "Intelligent Design" has no theoretical basis; it is simply a reassertion of the certainty of religious orthodoxy thinly disguised as scientific rigor. Its only "rigor," however, is intellectual rigor mortis. — Gary R. Collins, Jacksonville
Reader Reaction
      • calendar