• Granite comes in all ages

    Granite Man events at Applegate Lake are a family affair
  • Granted, most of the muscled men and women competing in the upcoming Granite Man triathlon are serious about their swim stroke. And running stride. And keeping mountain bike tires on the trail while slicing seconds off their finish time.
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    • Tips for Granite Man triathletes
      Granite Man's Chad Wikander offers these tips for getting your best time in the triathlon:

      Swim: Take it in stride and save some energy for the bike and the run. Applegate Lake is cle...
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      Tips for Granite Man triathletes
      Granite Man's Chad Wikander offers these tips for getting your best time in the triathlon:

      Swim: Take it in stride and save some energy for the bike and the run. Applegate Lake is clear and the current temperature is ideal.

      Bike: The course is a little technical but no really long climbs so you can really go for it as long as you don't bite in on a technical corner.

      Run: The route is very scenic on the trail and you can really floor it on the downhills and use the momentum for the little climbs.
  • Granted, most of the muscled men and women competing in the upcoming Granite Man triathlon are serious about their swim stroke. And running stride. And keeping mountain bike tires on the trail while slicing seconds off their finish time.
    But beyond the boasts about breaking "CRs" (course records), tales about skidding past 90-degree turns and descriptions of skin scrapes from careening down hills in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, there is lighthearted fun.
    Slow runners, families and spectators also enjoy this two-day racing series on idyllic Applegate Lake.
    Granite Man race director Chad Wikander, a past race winner himself, has added a 5K scavenger hunt and other activities to the seventh annual event, which takes place on Saturday and Sunday, June 1-2, at Hart-Tish Park. He is expecting 300 participants and uncountable people cheering them on.
    Across the country, race organizers are trying to broaden challenging triathlons to interest first-timers and bystanders, says Liz Hichens of Triathlete Magazine, based in San Diego, Calif.
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