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  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • On Saturday, May 25, the Siskiyou Velo, Slo-Mo bicycle group rode from Medford to Jacksonville. On the return ride one of our riders crashed and was injured.Within seconds, motorists and other bike riders stopped and offered assistance. One motorist loaded the injured rider's bicycle and was ready to transport the injured per...
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  • On Saturday, May 25, the Siskiyou Velo, Slo-Mo bicycle group rode from Medford to Jacksonville. On the return ride one of our riders crashed and was injured.Within seconds, motorists and other bike riders stopped and offered assistance. One motorist loaded the injured rider's bicycle and was ready to transport the injured person and spouse home. Within 10 minutes, while I was applying first aid to the injured person sirens were heard soon to be followed by the arrival of the Medford Fire Department rig and an ambulance. The injured rider was subsequently transported to the hospital for treatment. My lasting memory, however, will be about the wonderful, helpful and caring community in which we live. — L. Lee Purkerson, Medford
    My name is Harry Detwiler, an avid hunter and voter. I'm writing to ask all hunters and others who love our wonderful outdoors to call Sen. Alan Bates at 503-986-1703 and ask him to support a measure allowing county voters the right to decide locally how to deal with cougar populations.
    In 1994, a law was passed to curb cougar hunting with dogs; as a result, deer populations locally as well as throughout the state are diminishing. A cougar with cubs will eat a deer every 3.3 days, and an adult cougar will eat a deer per week. Cougars have decimated the deer population and are now preying on domesticated animals.
    We need your help to save our elk and deer herds. Please call your legislator and ask him to vote yes on HB 2624A. The passage of this bill would sharpen the role of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife in right-sizing the cougar population. Please call them today. — Harry Detwiler, Ashland
    Regarding Ryan Pfeil's piece on the funding shortfall for Oregon State University's Extension Service (May 26): If there is a shortfall of funding, why can't the local wine growers and orchardists take up the slack?
    There certainly is a public policy issue involved, so county taxpayers should be willing to support the Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center to some significant extent, but for the taxpayers to pick up the entire tab is both unfair and smacks of corporate welfare.
    We are all consumers, and we are all in some sense producers. No industry should get a free ride, any more than able-bodied citizens do.
    It is too easy for industries to glorify their support for, and value to, the local economy. The economy is supposed to be a competitive arena, without much favoritism across the board. Hard work and investment capital are necessary and laudable, but not a get-out-of-jail-free card for capitalists. Hard work is, after all, expected for successful agriculture, and if the Extension Center is a benefit to the primary agricultural interests in the valley, those interests should be collectively prepared to help support it financially — if they are not already doing so. — Gary R. Collins, Jacksonville
    My wife and I went to prospect for the Memorial Day parade and the community get-together. We saw a once-in-a-lifetime happening. The military had a ceremony to retire several flags — it was a real sad event, to thank the stars and stripes. Also, the meaning of each fold was explained.
    Everyone was so respectful of the event. Then, to think how the flag has been abused. We'd best keep honoring the flag and God the almighty. Instead of God Bless America, America should be blessing God the almighty.
    They also had food booths, vendors and races. It was a lot of fun. Try it sometime. Lots of nice, friendly people. — Richard Golphenee, Medford
    About six or eight years ago, I came back from a Mt. Ashland Ski Association meeting and told my wife I had just heard the meanest man I'd ever heard in a public meeting.
    Eric Navickas had given a diatribe against the plans of the association. "You're going to find out what passive resistance really means" was one of his statements. His delivery was aggressive and mean.
    So it didn't surprise me, after his election to the Ashland City Council, when they had to spend a few thousand bucks for a psychologist to help them get along. — Bill Johnson, Medford
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