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MailTribune.com
  • June 19, 1913

  • W.H. Wann, expert accountant employed by the county court to go over the books of the sheriff's office for the past six years, showed how the shortage in the sheriff's accounts totaling $21,000, which former Sheriff W.A. Jones paid out of personal funds, accumulated. The report does not say who got the money, or what was done with it, nor does it accuse anyone. A final report will be made later.
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  • W.H. Wann, expert accountant employed by the county court to go over the books of the sheriff's office for the past six years, showed how the shortage in the sheriff's accounts totaling $21,000, which former Sheriff W.A. Jones paid out of personal funds, accumulated. The report does not say who got the money, or what was done with it, nor does it accuse anyone. A final report will be made later.
    The shortage began in the year 1909. It totaled $3,110.19 that year. In 1910 it grew $3,500, the total shortage being $6,656.76. Nearly $10,000 additional disappeared in 1911, the total shortage at the end of the year totaling $16,120.50. In 1912 the annual shortage dropped down to $4,778, the shortage at the end of the year totaling $20,878.50.
    The report explains how sheriff J.H. Wilson was fooled by manipulation last July when he reported all shortage was made good. Taxes to the amount of $24,227.86 had been received but not entered on the tax ledger, and the money was counted as part of the taxes already entered. The money was paid in by the Southern Pacific March 23, 1912, but was not entered as paid until after Mr. Wilson had counted the cash in July with Deputy R.B. Dow. "This manipulation," states Mr. Wann, "not only covered the shortage but even allowed for a small surplus."
    Several hundred small errors in entries and collections were corrected as a result of the audit, and several hundred dollars is due Mr. Jones from the county for money paid in for which no receipts were discovered.
    Mr. Wann also states that former County Clerk W.R. Coleman, "has failed thus far to turn over trust funds to his successor." Demand has been made upon Mr. Coleman for the amount alleged due, $2,600. Mr. Coleman is straightening up the accounts with Clerk Gardner today.
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    One of the largest and most luxurious trains in the country will run over the South Pacific lines from Sacramento to this city Friday, carrying the "Hanky Panky" company, the musical comedy production which plays at the Page Theater tomorrow night. It will consists of eight cars, three compartment sleeping cars, three baggage cars and a day coach and diner. In order to arrive in this city in time to put the show on, a record-breaking run from Sacramento is necessary and every effort will be made to break the record for the distance. The track will be cleared for the theatrical special all along the line. It will leave Sacramento at 2:30 Friday morning and probably arrive here at 1:30 Friday afternoon, a run of eleven hours. Haste is necessary because of the length of time needed to stage the show.
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