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MailTribune.com
  • July 17, 1913

  • The effort of W.F. Arant to hold his job as superintendent of Crater Lake National Park, despite his summary removal by Secretary of the Interior Lane, and the rulings against him by the federal civil services board and Attorney General McRyenolds, and the stoppage of his pay July 1, has been referred to the U.S. Department o...
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  • The effort of W.F. Arant to hold his job as superintendent of Crater Lake National Park, despite his summary removal by Secretary of the Interior Lane, and the rulings against him by the federal civil services board and Attorney General McRyenolds, and the stoppage of his pay July 1, has been referred to the U.S. Department of Justice, which will probably take summary action and arrest him for trespass. Arant retains possession of the government headquarters, refusing to surrender on demand of Secretary Lane. Will G. Steel, who was appointed superintendent, also remains in the park on Lane's order.
    As a result of Arant's action, no work is being done on roads and trails, no auto licenses are being collected, no foresters are at work, and the short season is rapidly progressing without needed improvements being made, money for which is available.
    A.L. Parkhurst drove from the lake today and states that the road to the rim will by open by Saturday. It is now open within a few hundred yards. Work next week begins on finishing the stone inn, which was begun two years ago.
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    At the special session of the council Monday evening, F.W. Mears, in response to the council's request to prove his charges that gross immorality existed in Medford and that places of ill-fame were running wide open, read a long statement in which he quoted the new laws passed by the Legislature and quoted anonymous persons in proof of his assertions. Most of his statements were based on hearsay.
    H.D. Penfield asked why the city had not closed the Royal Rooming House. Rev. Eldridge of the Methodist Church said that unless the city authorities took steps to clean up the city of immoral women, the citizens would. Rev. Boyle said the new laws gave the city authorities ample jurisdiction. H.C. Garnett said that he had heard that the rooming house above the mayor's shop was a house of ill-fame, and had heard that a house near Councilman Summerville's was a similar institution.
    Rev. Eldridge suggested that detectives be appointed to watch suspected places and gather evidence. Mr. Fouts, Dr. Lockwood, Mr. Stine and others spoke. City Attorney McCabe stated that the only way out of the difficulty would be to secure someone willing to turn state's evidence against the women.
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