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  • Mariners manager Wedge suffers 'mild stroke'
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  • Mariners manager Wedge suffers 'mild stroke'
    Mariners manager Eric Wedge sustained what the club called a "very mild stroke," but he was released from the hospital on Wednesday and is expected to make a full recovery.
    The 45-year-old Wedge was hospitalized Monday when he complained about light-headedness during batting practice.
    He missed the entire three-game series against Cleveland, but after a battery of tests was sent home from the hospital Wednesday afternoon, the Mariners said in a statement.
    Wedge, the Mariners manager since 2011, won't be in uniform for the Mariners' upcoming four-game series against Minnesota and he won't go on the next road trip to Boston and Baltimore.
    Bench coach Robby Thompson will continue to fill in for Wedge, who was the Indians' manager from 2003-09.
    South Carolina looking into Clowney contact
    South Carolina's athletic compliance department is looking into contact between defensive end Jadeveon Clowney and rap mogul turned sports agency head, Jay-Z.
    Spokesman Steve Fink said Wednesday the department was aware of reports about conversations between Jay-Z and Clowney, the 6-foot-6, 274-pound lineman who's considered the top pick in next year's NFL draft.
    Athletes are permitted under NCAA rules to talk with agents, just not reach agreements about future representation. Athletes cannot accept benefits from agents or their representatives while in college.
    Cyclist O'Grady admits doping in 1998 Tour
    A day after retiring from professional cycling, Stuart O'Grady admitted to using a blood-booster during the scandal-plagued 1998 Tour de France.
    The 39-year-old Australian rider, a six-time Olympian who wore the leader's yellow jersey for a total of nine days in 17 Tours de France, announced his retirement earlier this week after the 100th edition of the famous race. He admitted he had used erythropoietin (EPO) for two weeks before the 1998 race, saying he had acquired it himself and used it without the knowledge of his team.
    His admission in an Australian newspaper came after the French senate inquiry into doping in sport released its findings and implicated dozens of cyclists for suspicious tests, uncovering evidence that 1998 Tour de France champion Marco Pantani and runner-up Jan Ulrich used EPO to fuel their performances.
    New ESPN sports docs include 'Tonya and Nancy'
    BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — The knee whack heard 'round the world will be revisited near the 20th anniversary of the rivalry between Olympic figure skaters Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding, as one of six new documentaries on ESPN's "30 for 30" series.
    The series' second season begins Oct. 1 with "Hawaiian: The Legend of Eddie Aikau," about the big wave surfer and lifeguard.
    It wraps up Nov. 5 with "Tonya and Nancy," a look back at the Jan. 6, 1994, incident in which Kerrigan was clubbed on the knee after practice for the U.S. championships in a plot masterminded by Harding's ex-husband. The film includes new interviews with Harding and people close to Kerrigan.
    Compiled from wire reports
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